Gradient

 

This first comprehensive survey of Paul Evans's work, this exhibition will document Evans's role in the midcentury American studio furniture movement, his approach to furniture as sculpture and abstract composition, and his unremitting new approaches to metal. Opening at the Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Pennsylvania and then traveling to Cranbrook Art Museum—the only other venue for the exhibition—Paul Evans: Crossing Boundaries and Crafting Modernism will be comprised of some sixty-five works, spanning the artist's entire career. It includes choice examples of Evans's early metalwork and jewelry, collaborative pieces made by Evans and Phillip Lloyd Powell during the fifties when they shared a studio, as well as a comprehensive selection of Evans's studio work representing his sculpted steel; verdigris copper; copper, bronze and pewter; argenté sculpted bronze, and cityscape techniques. The show will also include examples of Evans's sculpture as well as a selection of work he produced for Directional Furniture Company. The presentation at Cranbrook Art Museum will include work by Evans’s contemporaries selected from Cranbrook’s permanent collection, including the celebrated Shuey Collection, placing his pioneering designs for furniture with the context of concurrent trends in midcentury art and design.

Paul Evans studied Metalsmithing at Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1952 and 1953, working with Artist-in-Residence Richard Thomas.

For an interview with architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien on Paul Evans, please click here.

Paul Evans: Crossing Boundaries and Crafting Modernism was organized by the James A. Michener Art Museum, Doylestown, Pennsylvania, and curated by Constance Kimmerle. The presentation at Cranbrook is supported, in part, by the David Klein and Kathryn Ostrove Exhibition Fund.



Warhol On Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987+
ArtMembers' Opening Reception: Friday, June 20, 2014
Public Exhibition Dates: June 21, 2014 – March 15, 2015

Andy Warhol envisioned the record cover as a means to popularize his name as an artist and, once he reached iconic status in the 1960s, used it to directly impact popular culture.  Designed to be collected by the masses, the records—numbering more than fifty— reinforce his maxim “repetition adds up to reputation.” While only a fortunate few own a Warhol painting, millions own his design for Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers

The exhibition is drawn from the world’s preeminent collection of record covers by Andy Warhol, a recent gift to Cranbrook Art Museum by Frank M. Edwards and Ann Williams.  It features the authenticated covers ranging from the extremely rare to the widely recognizable, together which offer a unique lens to survey the artist’s career from a young graphic designer to a cultural phenomenon.  At the same time, it documents the history of the mass-produced vinyl record and the zeitgeist of these eras through the inclusion of music, videos, interviews, and artworks from the Art Museum’s extensive Andy Warhol collection.  The exhibition will also include album covers created after his death in 1987 that appropriate Warhol’s imagery and testify to his influence on subsequent generations. 

Warhol On Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987+ is organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Curator of Contemporary Art and Design Laura Mott.

 


Culture Breakers: The Living Structures of Ken Isaacs
Public Exhibition Dates: June 21 – October 5, 2014

Throughout a career spanning over half a century, former Cranbrook Academy of Art student and instructor Ken Isaacs (b. 1927) radically deconstructed conventional notions of modernism. His Living Structures—hand-made, low-cost, multifunctional furniture and architectural units—challenged ideas of how people could sit, work, and live within their own homes and the broader built environment. Culture Breakers: The Living Structures of Ken Isaacs highlights Isaacs’s time in the 1950s at Cranbrook as both student and head of the Design Department, his experimentations as an educator with environmental learning, and his role within the countercultural community of the 1960s and 1970s, when he gained wider recognition for his populist approach to design.

Featuring works on paper, photographs, film, architectural models, and several reproduced Living Structures—including his earliest configuration which was presented at the 1954 Cranbrook Academy of Art Graduate Degree show—this exhibition examines Isaacs’s role as a nonconformist who created simple, economical, functional systems of living that could be built by anyone. By spreading his designs through mass-instruction instead of mass-production, Isaacs encouraged a do-it-yourself outlook that empowered consumers through the act of making.

Curated by Shelley Selim, Cranbrook Art Museum's 2013-2015 Jeanne and Ralph Graham Collections Fellow. Photo © John G. Zimmerman Archive www.johngzimmerman.com.

 

Modern / Moderna: Amie Siegel and Terence Gower
Public Exhibition Dates: June 21-August 31, 2014

 
An exploration of Modernism through two contemporary artworks: Amie Siegel's The Modernists,  a reassembled personal archive of found travel photographs and film footage of an unknown couple during the 1960s-80s; and Terence Gower's Ciudad Moderna, a re-imagining of a popular 1966 Mexican film where the architecture is presented as the protagonist.

Organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Curator of Contemporary Art and Design Laura Mott. 

 



Cranbrook Goes to the Movies: Films and Their Objects, 1925-1975
Public Exhibition Dates: June 21, 2014 – March 15, 2015

Cranbrook and the camera grew up together. In the 1920s, as George and Ellen Booth were realizing their dream of a community dedicated to art, science, and education, amateur filmmaking flourished as a newly affordable hobby. These two historical trajectories—that of an educational community and of a medium that has shaped the cultural experience of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries—intersect in Cranbrook Goes to the Movies.

The vintage films featured in this exhibition bring the diverse history of Cranbrook’s campus alive in a way never before experienced; through the actual people and objects that populated it. Archival film can feel distant, a relic of days past, and historic objects are too often divorced from their time period and their context. Cranbrook Goes to the Movies reunites the material with the ephemeral, giving physical presence to the vintage films that document life at Cranbrook and placing some of Cranbrook’s treasures in their historic context. An immersive experience, Cranbrook Goes to the Movies provides an avenue into Cranbrook’s past built not on dry text and static images but on the vitality and movements of the people who lived it.

Cranbrook Goes to the Movies: Objects and Film, 1925-1975 is organized by the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research and curated by the Center’s 2012-2014 Collections Fellow Shoshana Resnikoff. The Center, which includes Cranbrook Archives, is supported, in part, by its Charter Patrons, the Towbes Foundation of Santa Barbara, California, and the Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation.

 


2015 Graduate Degree Exhibition of Cranbrook Academy of Art
Public Exhibition Dates: April 19, 2015 – May 10, 2015

 

 

 

Future Exhibitions