The Seen Examines My Brain Is in My Inkstand

Tony Orrico at Cranbrook Art Museum on November 15, 2013. Photo courtesy of Cranbrook Art Museum.

The Seen, Chicago’s International Online Journal of Contemporary & Modern Art, recently visited the current exhibition My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process and said the exhibition asks viewers “to dig deeper into the discipline of drawing – to understand it as evidence of a space where thought and action overlap, and continuously unfold into processes, rather than two distinct stages of completion.”

Read the full review here.

“Strauss Deconstructed” in the Detroit Free Press

The Detroit Free Press takes an inside look at the upcoming performance from the Detroit Chamber Winds and Strings at Cranbrook Art Museum, and the innovative way the group plans to get the audience “more involved in the creation of art,” says Maury Okun, executive director of Detroit Chamber Winds and Strings. Click here for the full story.

New Curator of Contemporary Art and Design

Bloomfield Hills, Mich., Nov. 21, 2013 – Cranbrook Art Museum is pleased to announce the appointment of Laura Mott as Cranbrook’s new Curator of Contemporary Art and Design. Mott will be responsible for the Art Museum’s exhibition programs as well as the development and presentation of its collection of modern and contemporary art, architecture, and design.

“Laura is an artist’s curator,” says Gregory Wittkopp, Director of Cranbrook Art Museum and the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research. “She is a professional for whom working directly with artists and the objects they make is at the core of her work.”

Wittkopp continues, “With an innovative curatorial practice that has been based in both the United States and Europe, Mott’s exhibitions and writing have demonstrated her ability to actively engage the public with the work of an impressive range of contemporary artists, architects, musicians, and choreographers.”

Mott began her career in New York working with curator Lawrence Rinder on the Whitney Museum of American Art’s 2002 Biennial exhibition and publication, followed by experience in the commercial art world at the Peter Freeman gallery in New York. After attending graduate school at the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, Mott then moved to San Francisco where she served as the Curator/Assistant Director of Mission 17, a not-for-profit institution. Among other projects, she oversaw Mission 17’s Visual/Cultural Criticism Residency, as well as a curatorial internship and lecture program.

In 2009, Mott moved to Sweden where she was the Curator of Exhibitions at the University of Gothenburg’s Valand Academy. During her three years there, she worked closely with undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students in the fine arts department and developed an ambitious exhibition program for the university’s Galleri Rotor, establishing it as one of Gothenburg’s premier spaces for contemporary art. She also was part of the team than ran the Valand Artistic Research Centre’s artists-in-residence program, and organized and hosted a series of weekly lectures and academic seminars.

During her tenure at the Valand Academy, Mott also served as an interim Curator at the Gothenburg Konsthall, where she curated the seminal exhibition Everything Under Heaven is Total Chaos by the artists’ collective International Festival, and was a Guest Producer/Curator at Iaspis, an international artists residency program in Stockholm.

Mott taught several courses on exhibition-making at Valand Academy, and served as a guest lecturer at the university’s School of Photography and School of Design and Craft, as well as Dômens Art Academy in Gothenburg, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Moscow, and the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague, where she conceived and taught the seminar The Life of an Artwork: From Idea to Extinction.

Mott is a graduate of the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, New York, where she received an MA in Curatorial Studies, and the University of Texas, where she received both a BFA in Art History and a BA in Studio Art. Laura Mott began her new post at Cranbrook Art Museum on November 18.

About Cranbrook Art Museum
Cranbrook Art Museum is located at 39221 Woodward Avenue, on the campus of Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills. It is an integral part of Cranbrook Academy of Art, a community of Artists-in-Residence and graduate-level students of art, design and architecture. The Art Museum, which was established in 1930 and opened in its current building in 1942, is Eliel Saarinen’s final masterwork at Cranbrook. Today, the Art Museum presents original exhibitions and educational programming on modern and contemporary architecture, art, crafts, and design, as well as traveling exhibitions, films, workshops, travel tours, and lectures by renowned artists, designers, artists, and critics throughout the year. In 2011, the Art Museum completed a three-year $22 million construction project that includes both the restoration of the Saarinen-design building and a new state-of-the-art Collections Wing addition. Cranbrook Archives and the offices of the new Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research also are located within the Art Museum. For more information, visit www.cranbrook.edu.

For a high resolution photo of Mott, please contact Julie Fracker at jfracker@cranbrook.edu.

 

Image Credit: Lindsay Vila

Cranbrook Art Museum Installs Skate Ramp at Modern Skate Park in Royal Oak

Skaters encouraged to leave their mark; surface will be removed and installed in Museum as part of new exhibition

Video

BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich., Oct. 29, 2013 – Cranbrook Art Museum just completed the installation of a new half-pipe skate ramp at Modern State Park in Royal Oak. Skaters are encouraged to use the ramp over the next few weeks and leave their mark, then the surface will be peeled away and it will become part of the Museum’s new exhibition, My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process, which opens on November 16.

The exhibition examines the work of 22 artists from around the world as they show how the act of drawing impacts both artistic and scientific thinking. This project is directed by Chemi Rosado-Seijo, an artist whose History on Wheels project is an ongoing exploration of the correlation between skateboarding and artistic practice.

The ramp was built by Cranbrook Academy of Art graduate Mark Dineen (3D ’13) to Rosado-Seijo’s exact specifications, the dimensions of which refer to his own body measurements.

According to Rosado-Seijo, his skate-drawings bear individually determined traces of a region: the color of the earth, the dirt of the streets and the specific local skating techniques. The abstract marks of the skater’s wheels, deck and body seem random yet they are highly site-specific.

The ramp will be available for the public to use until Nov. 12 (regular Modern Skate admission hours and rates apply) – at which time the surface will be peeled away by Rosado-Seijo and installed at Cranbrook Art Museum. It will measure more than 25 feet in length.

Interactive and live performances are an integral part of My Brain Is in My Inkstand. Artist Tony Orrico will conduct a live public performance at Cranbrook Art Museum from Nov. 15-18, creating a drawing with his body that will remain in the Museum as part of the exhibition. Artist and composer Tristan Perich will also install a live Machine Drawing that uses mechanics and code to cumulatively etch markings across a Museum wall.

For the full press release of all exhibitions opening on November 16, click here. To see the ramp in action, click here.

Modern Skate Park is located at 1500 N. Stephenson Highway in Royal Oak, Michigan.

My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process is organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Nina Samuel. Cranbrook Art Museum gratefully acknowleges the support of Modern Skate Park and its owner George Leichtweis.

My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process Opens at Cranbrook Art Museum in November

For Immediate Release
Julie Fracker
Cranbrook Academy of Art & Art Museum
Office: 248.645.3329
Cell: 248.770.1721
jfracker@cranbrook.edu

My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process
Opens at Cranbrook Art Museum in November

Bloomfield Hills, Mich., October 17, 2013 – On November 16, 2013, Cranbrook Art Museum will open a new season of exhibitions examining how the act of drawing impacts both artistic and scientific thinking.

Through the new major exhibition, My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process, and the accompanying traveling exhibition, The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot: Fractals, Chaos, and the Materiality of Thinking, Cranbrook Art Museum will examine how sketches on paper are the first materialized traces of an idea, and how they are used as an instrument to make a meandering thought concrete.

An exhibition examining the work of Cranbrook’s first Resident Ceramic Sculptor, Waylande Gregory: Art Deco Ceramics and the Atomic Impulse, will also open on November 16.

With an opening weekend full of live performances and work from artists and scientists, a basketball coach and skateboarder, a biologist and even Native American Indians, the exhibitions promise to take you on a journey, demonstrating that if you can think it you can do it – but first you must draw it.

 

My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process
November 16, 2013 – March 30, 2014

An original new exhibition organized by Cranbrook Art Museum brings together 22 artists from around the world to redefine the notion of drawing as a thinking process in the arts and sciences alike.

Inspired by the accompanying exhibition The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot, the exhibition uses multiple sources to show how drawings reveal the interdependency of mark making and thinking. Featured artists include John Cage, Front Design, legendary basketball coach Phil Jackson, Mark Lombardi, Tony Orrico, Tristan Perich, Ruth Adler Schnee, Carolee Schneemann, and many more practitioners from around the world (click here for a complete list). The exhibition will also incorporate work from the collections of Cranbrook Institute of Science and the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research.

Artist Tony Orrico (pictured above) will conduct a live public performance from 11am – 3pm on both Saturday, November 16 and Sunday, November 17 as he continues a three-day process of creating a drawing that will remain in the Museum for the duration of the exhibition. Artist and composer Tristan Perch will install a live Machine Drawing that uses mechanics and code to cumulatively etch markings across a Museum wall.

The title of the exhibition derives from a quotation by American philosopher, mathematician and scientist Charles Sanders Peirce, whose work involving the over- and under-laying of mathematical formulas with pictographic drawings will be presented for the first time.

Organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by independent curator Nina Samuel.

 

The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot: Fractals, Chaos, and the Materiality of Thinking
November 16, 2013 – March 30, 2014

Focusing on the work of mathematician Benoît Mandelbrot (1924 – 2010), this exhibition explores the role of images in scientific thinking. Featuring works on paper, photographs, objects, and films, viewers can take an inside look at aspects of a new world of ideas that became popularly known as fractal geometry and chaos theory.


Organized by the Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, Design History, Material Culture, New York, and curated by independent curator Nina Samuel.

 

Waylande Gregory: Art Deco Ceramics and the Atomic Impulse
November 16, 2013 – March 23, 2014

Waylande Gregory (1905 – 1971) was one of the leading figures in 20th-century American ceramics, helping shape Art Deco design in the United States. In 1931 and 1932, he served as Resident Ceramic Sculptor at Cranbrook Academy of Art, and helped develop the Academy’s ceramics program. Although he worked at Cranbrook for only 18 months, Gregory produced several well-known sculptures here, including Kansas Madonna and Girl with Olive, both of which are featured in the exhibition.

Organized and circulated by the University of Richmond Museums, Virginia, and curated by independent ceramics scholar Dr. Thomas C. Folk.


Opening Weekend Activities

Visit during the opening weekend and take part in activities, live performances, talks and demonstrations designed to bring the act of drawing to life.

Friday, November 15

Become an ArtMember to take part in these exclusive events. Memberships may be purchased at the Front Desk.

ArtMembers’ Opening Reception: 6-8pm
Meet six of the artists in the exhibition, and curators Nina Samuel and Thomas Folk.

Artist Tony Orrico will conduct a live performance from 6-8pm in the Main Gallery, as he begins the three-day process of creating a drawing that will remain in the Museum for the duration of the exhibition.

From 8-8:30pm, enjoy a rare musical performance by artist and composer Tristan Perich, whose live Machine Drawing will also be activated that night.
__________

Saturday, November 16

Exhibition Opens to the General Public: 11am – 5pm
Tony Orrico continues his live drawing performance, from 11am-3pm in the Main Gallery.

Lecture Marathon: Noon – 5pm
All lectures take place in deSalle Auditorium and are included with regular Museum admission and free for ArtMembers and students with identification.

Corrie Van Sice (Creative Researcher)
Noon

“Cultural Amnesia: Synthetic Biology and the Mechanism of Life”

David Bowen (Studio Artist and Educator)
1pm

“Computing Natural Phenomena”

Chemi Rosado Seijo (Artist and Skateboarder)
2pm

“Art and the Urban Landscape”

Tristan Perich (Artist and Composer)
3pm

“Machine Drawings and the Visual Composition”

Tony Orrico (Visual and Performance Artist)
4pm

“State of Readiness: The Body as an Art Apparatus”

__________

Sunday, November 17

Tony Orrico continues his live drawing performance, from 11am-3pm in the Main Gallery.

Lecture by Thomas Folk (Curator and Ceramics Historian)
4pm

“Waylande Gregory: Art Deco Ceramics and the Atomic Impulse”

__________

Tuesday, November 19

Lecture by Nina Samuel (Curator and Art and Science Historian)
6pm

“My Brain is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process”

__________

Hours and Admission
Academic Year Hours (September through June):
Tuesday – Friday, 10am – 5pm
Saturday and Sunday, 11am – 5pm
Closed Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve and Day, and New Year’s Eve and Day

Admission:
ArtMembers and Children 12 & under, Always Free
General: $8
Seniors (65+): $6
Students with ID: $4

Accessibility:
Barrier free access to the galleries of Cranbrook Art Museum can be accommodated through the adjacent New Studios Building. Visitors with disabilities are encouraged to call the Front Desk of the Art Museum at 248-645-3320 during regular museum hours for assistance. If you are planning your visit in advance, you may also call the Art Museum Administrative Offices at 248-645-3319 (Monday through Friday, 9am– 5pm) for additional information.

About Cranbrook Art Museum
Cranbrook Art Museum is located at 39221 Woodward Avenue, on the campus of Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills. It is an integral part of Cranbrook Academy of Art, a community of Artists-in-Residence and graduate-level students of art, design and architecture. The Art Museum, which was established in 1930 and opened in its current building in 1942, is Eliel Saarinen’s final masterwork at Cranbrook. Today, the Art Museum presents original exhibitions and educational programming on modern and contemporary architecture, art, crafts, and design, as well as traveling exhibitions, films, workshops, travel tours, and lectures by renowned artists, designers, artists, and critics throughout the year. In 2011, the Art Museum completed a three-year $22 million construction project that includes both the restoration of the Saarinen-design building and a new state-of-the-art Collections Wing addition. Cranbrook Archives and the offices of the new Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research also are located within the Art Museum. For more information, visit www.cranbrook.edu.

 

Images: Tony Orrico. Photo by Bill E. Meyers. Courtesy of the artist and UB Art Gallery.

Benoît Mandelbrot. Scribbled arrows showing the technique of magnifications of details. Computer-generated prints with scribbles. Collection Aliette Mandelbrot.

Gregory Waylande, Water, 1938, from the Fountain of the Atom, New York World’s Fair, 1939. Collection of Cranbrook Art Museum, partial gift of Patricia Shaw. Photography by R. H. Hensleigh and Tim Thayer.

Detroit News Highlights Michigan Modern Lecture Series

This Sunday kicks off our new five-part lecture series welcoming back several speakers from the groundbreaking Michigan Modern™: Design that Shaped America symposium held at Cranbrook in June.

We will host a lecture at Cranbrook Art Museum every Sunday at 4pm until the exhibition closes on Oct. 13. All lectures will be held at deSalle Auditorium at Cranbrook Art Museum and are included with Museum admission. Lectures are free for ArtMembers.

The Detroit News highlighted the lecture series in today’s Homestyle section.

Photo: Alden B. Dow Home and Studio, Midland, designed by Alden B. Dow. Photographer: Steve Vorderman for the Michigan State Historic Preservation Office.

The Detroit News Features Anders Ruhwald Exhibition

The Detroit News takes at look at the current Anders Ruhwald exhibition at Sarrinen House, saying, “it’s up to you to decide whether Ruhwald’s esthetic challenges or highlights the restrained elegance Saarinen House is famous for.” For the full story, click here.

Image: Anders Ruhwald
Lamp (Gottlieb’s Gaze), 2011
Book Room
Glazed earthenware and lamp components
30-1/4 x 27 x 9-7/8 inches
Collection of Gary L. Wasserman
Photograph by Tim Thayer and R. H. Hensleigh;
Photography ©Cranbrook Art Museum