Cranbrook Art Museum and Nick Cave Announce “The Biggest, Baddest Performance of All Time!” Thanks to Support From Knight Arts Challenge Detroit

Photo by James Prinz Photography. Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Bloomfield Hills, Mich., Oct. 6, 2014 – Cranbrook Art Museum and artist Nick Cave will launch “The Biggest, Baddest Performance of All Time!” thanks to support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Knight Foundation announced today that Cranbrook Art Museum will receive a matching grant of $150,000 to mount the ambitious project, which will begin early next year and take place throughout 2015. The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation’s Knight Arts Challenge funds ideas that engage and enrich Detroit through the arts.

Cranbrook’s vision for the project includes impromptu flash mob Soundsuit invasions throughout the city, dance labs at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, a new performance by the artist filmed in Detroit, costuming workshops with children, and the culmination of it all, Figure This: Detroit, a massive processional and performance downtown.

This sweeping project will be undertaken in conjunction with Cave’s solo exhibition Here Hear, which will open at Cranbrook Art Museum on June 20, 2015 and run through October 11, 2015. The exhibition will be curated by Laura Mott, Cranbrook’s Curator of Contemporary Art and Design, who will also be coordinating the performances in Detroit.”

“This exhibition and the accompanying performances and events in Detroit will not only be Nick Cave’s ‘Biggest, Baddest Performance of All Time,’ but thanks to the Knight Foundation, whose team encouraged us to dream big, it will also be one of the most ambitious projects our Museum has ever undertaken. It not only celebrates one of Cranbrook Academy of Art’s most revered graduates, but also demonstrates Cranbrook’s commitment to the celebration and revitalization of Detroit,” says Gregory Wittkopp, Director of Cranbrook Art Museum and the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research.

“Few things bring people together like the arts. We hope these events touch many Detroiters and inspire them to think creatively about their lives and city,” said Dennis Scholl, vice president of arts for Knight Foundation.

Nick Cave is an African-American artist and dancer, famous for his embellished costumes, called Soundsuits, which he often stages in public spectacle. Though influenced by a vibrant palette of African art, armor, found objects, fashion and textile design, the Soundsuit are rooted in social critique. Cave first created a suit in the aftermath of the Rodney King beatings in 1991, envisioning an emotional shield that protects one’s race or gender while still expressing individuality.

“My connection to the city of Detroit began during graduate school when I attended Cranbrook Academy of Art in the late 1980s,” says Cave. “My extensive time spent in the city was also an important part of my education and growth as an artist. This ambitious performance and the educational components presented in this project are based on conversations with local artists, arts organizations, and non-profits, as well as my visceral experience of the incredible locations throughout different areas of Detroit.”

Cave continues, “My goal is to work with these groups and those who live in and love the city to reimagine Detroit as an always-surprising environment of creativity, excitement, and engagement. I began to dream big, because I believe it is important for Detroit to be dreaming ambitiously at this moment in regards to its own future.”

About the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation supports transformational ideas that promote quality journalism, advance media innovation, engage communities and foster the arts. The foundation believes that democracy thrives when people and communities are informed and engaged. For more, visit KnightFoundation.org.

About Cranbrook Art Museum
Cranbrook Art Museum is located at 39221 Woodward Avenue, on the campus of Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills. It is an integral part of Cranbrook Academy of Art, a community of Artists-in-Residence and graduate-level students of art, design, and architecture. The Art Museum, which was established in 1930 and opened in its current building in 1942, is Eliel Saarinen’s final masterwork at Cranbrook. Today, the Art Museum presents original exhibitions and educational programming on modern and contemporary architecture, art, crafts, and design, as well as traveling exhibitions, films, workshops, travel tours, and lectures by renowned artists, designers, artists, and critics throughout the year. In 2011, the Art Museum completed a three-year $22 million construction project that includes both the restoration of the Saarinen-design building and a new state-of-the-art Collections Wing addition. Cranbrook Archives and the offices of the new Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research also are located within the Art Museum. For more information, visit www.cranbrook.edu.

Warhol On Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987+ Opens at Cranbrook Art Museum

BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich., May 28, 2014 – Cranbrook Art Museum announces the opening of six new exhibitions that will debut with a weekend of celebration on June 20-22.

Beginning with the opening of Warhol On Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987+, the Museum will exhibit nearly 100 album covers, including variations of more than 50 unique designs by Andy Warhol throughout his career. Featured in the exhibitions will be the world-premiere of three album covers that have never before been exhibited, including a cover recently discovered last year. Cranbrook has also been loaned a copy of the one-of-a-kind “Night Beat” album cover, making this the most comprehensive exhibition of authenticated record covers to date. See every cover Warhol designed, from the iconic Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers to the extremely rare Giant Size $1.57 Each, his first Pop Art record cover.

The sculptural furniture of designer/craftsman and former Cranbrook Academy of Art student Paul Evans will be on display in Paul Evans: Crossing Boundaries and Crafting Modernism. And the multifunctional furniture and architectural units of Ken Isaacs will be showcased in Culture Breakers: The Living Structures of Ken Isaacs.

Follow the history of Cranbrook in film in Cranbrook Goes to the Movies: Films and Their Objects, 1925-1975, and study the lighter side of Cranbrook’s history in Ephemera: Fragments from Cranbrook’s Social Life.

And finally, explore Modernism through the contemporary works of Amie Siegel’s The Modernists and Terence Gower’s Ciudad Moderna.

“Cranbrook is widely recognized as the ‘cradle of Modernism,’ a history that we have reflected in our two most recent summer exhibitions, George Nelson: Architect | Writer | Designer | Teacher and Michigan Modern: Design that Shaped America,” says Gregory Wittkopp, Director of Cranbrook Art Museum and the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research. “This summer we are illuminating some of the lesser-known stories of mid-century Modernism, including two designers that studied or taught at Cranbrook: Paul Evans and Ken Isaacs. We will also look at Andy Warhol, who, although undeniably iconic, is not known for his designs for record covers. His story is one that can only be told here at Cranbrook. With the recent gift of this collection from Frank Edwards and Ann Williams, Cranbrook Art Museum now has the world’s most comprehensive collection of Warhol’s record covers, including several covers that have never been seen publicly.”

It all kicks off with the ArtMembers’ Opening Reception on June 20 from 6-10pm, featuring the music of NUCLASSICA and the Music Institute at Cranbrook. The exhibitions open to the public on June 21, and we’ll continue to celebrate with the PNC Bank Family Fun Celebration on June 22. See below for details about each exhibition and dates/times to join the fun. And check our website for a complete schedule of summer events.

Sunday, June 22
PNC Bank Family Fun Celebration!

Visit the Museum for a day full of music, food, and crafts as we celebrate the opening of our summer exhibitions.

11am – 5pm: Museum is open to the public.
11:30am – 4:30pm: Sugar Magnolia’s food truck will be serving sweets.
12:30pm, 1:30pm, 2:30pm, and 3:30pm: Thumbs Up! Michigan’s premier ukulele band will perform covers of Andy Warhol’s Velvet Underground.
1 – 4pm: Get inspired by Warhol On Vinyl, then watch as your limited-edition Cranbrook/Warhol T-shirt is made! Academy graduate Wes Taylor will be here to operate a six-arm T-shirt press while you watch. Extra cost for the purchase of the shirt.
1pm and 3pm: Tour the Art Deco masterwork Saarinen House.
Noon, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm and 4pm: Take an Exhibition Highlight Tour of our new shows.

Exhibition Details

Warhol On Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987+
June 21, 2014 – March 15, 2015

The exhibition is drawn from Cranbrook Art Museum’s preeminent collection of record covers by Andy Warhol, a recent gift by Frank M. Edwards and Ann M. Williams. The album covers range from the extremely rare to the widely recognizable; together they offer a unique lens to survey the artist’s career from a young graphic designer to a cultural phenomenon. At the same time, the exhibition documents the history of the mass-produced vinyl record and the zeitgeist of these eras through the inclusion of music, video, and artworks from the Museum’s extensive Andy Warhol collection, including nine prints, which are a recent gift from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Listening booths in the gallery will allow viewers to play select albums, thereby producing an experience between the cover art and the music—rock, classical, opera, jazz, soul, experimental—the way Warhol intended. The exhibition also includes album covers by other musicians that have controversially appropriated Warhol’s imagery and testify to his influence on subsequent generations.

The world-premiere presentation of Warhol on Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949 – 1987+ was organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Curator of Contemporary Art and Design Laura Mott. The exhibition is sponsored by the Jeanne and Ralph Graham Exhibition Fund and the Clannad Foundation.

Paul Evans: Crossing Boundaries and Crafting Modernism
June 21, 2014 – October 12, 2014
In a new documentary, musician Lenny Kravitz says the work of Paul Evans is, “stunningly beautiful, stunningly ugly, stunningly tacky, stunningly sophisticated.” This exhibition is the first comprehensive survey of Evans’s work, documenting his role in the midcentury American studio furniture movement, his approach to furniture as sculpture and abstract composition, and his unremitting new approaches to metal.

Opening earlier this year at the Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, and then traveling to Cranbrook Art Museum—the only other venue for the exhibition—Paul Evans: Crossing Boundaries and Crafting Modernism will be comprised of 68 works, spanning the artist’s entire career. It includes choice examples of Evans’s early metalwork and jewelry, collaborative pieces made by Evans and Phillip Lloyd Powell during the 1950s when they shared a studio, as well as a comprehensive selection of Evans’s studio work representing his sculpted steel; verdigris copper; copper, bronze and pewter; argenté sculpted bronze, and cityscape techniques.

The show will also include examples of Evans’s sculpture and a selection of work he produced for Directional Furniture Company. The presentation at Cranbrook Art Museum will include work by Evans’s contemporaries selected from Cranbrook’s permanent collection, including the celebrated Shuey Collection, placing his pioneering designs for furniture with the context of concurrent trends in midcentury art and design. Evans studied Metalsmithing at Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1952 and 1953, working with Artist-in-Residence Richard Thomas.

Paul Evans: Crossing Boundaries and Crafting Modernism was organized by the James A. Michener Art Museum, Doylestown, Pennsylvania, and curated by Constance Kimmerle. The presentation at Cranbrook is supported, in part, by the David Klein and Kathryn Ostrove Exhibition Fund.

Culture Breakers: The Living Structures of Ken Isaacs
June 21 – October 5, 2014

Former Cranbrook Academy of Art student and instructor Ken Isaacs radically deconstructed conventional notions of modernism. His Living Structures—hand-made, low-cost, multifunctional furniture and architectural units—challenged ideas of how people could sit, work, and live within their own homes and the broader built environment.

Culture Breakers: The Living Structures of Ken Isaacs highlights Isaacs’s time in the 1950s at Cranbrook as both student and head of the Design Department, his experimentations as an educator with environmental learning, and his role within the countercultural community of the 1960s and 1970s, when he gained wider recognition for his populist approach to design.

Featuring works on paper, photographs, film, architectural models, and several reproduced Living Structures—this exhibition examines Isaacs’s role as a nonconformist who created simple, economical, functional systems of living that could be built by anyone. By spreading his designs through mass-instruction instead of mass-production, Isaacs encouraged a do-it-yourself outlook that empowered consumers through the act of making.

Organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Shelley Selim, Cranbrook Art Museum’s 2013-2015 Jeanne and Ralph Graham Collections Fellow.

Modern / Moderna: Amie Siegel and Terence Gower
June 21 – August 31, 2014

Modern/Moderna explores the societal and cultural trends of Modernism through two contemporary artworks. Amie Siegel’s The Modernists is a reassembled personal archive of found travel photographs and film footage of an unknown couple during the 1960s-1980s; it examines the domestic camera’s gendered relationship to sculpture, fashion, and our private/public selves. Terence Gower’s Ciudad Moderna, uses the popular 1966 Mexican film Despedida de Casada as source material of the contemporary city and re-edits the film to feature the architecture as the protagonist.

Organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Curator of Contemporary Art and Design Laura Mott.

Cranbrook Goes to the Movies: Films and Their Objects, 1925-1975
June 21, 2014 – November 30, 2014

Cranbrook and the camera grew up together. In the 1920s, as George and Ellen Booth were realizing their dream of a community dedicated to art, science, and education, amateur filmmaking flourished as a newly affordable hobby. These two historical trajectories intersect in Cranbrook Goes to the Movies.

The vintage films featured in this exhibition bring the diverse history of Cranbrook’s campus alive in a way never before experienced; through the actual people and objects that populated it. Cranbrook Goes to the Movies gives physical presence to the vintage films that document life at Cranbrook and places some of Cranbrook’s treasures in their historical context. An immersive experience, Cranbrook Goes to the Movies provides an avenue into Cranbrook’s past built not on dry text and static images but on the vitality and movements of the people who lived it.

Cranbrook Goes to the Movies: Films and Their Objects, 1925-1975 is organized by the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research and curated by the Center’s 2012-2014 Collections Fellow Shoshana Resnikoff. The Center, which includes Cranbrook Archives, is supported, in part, by its Charter Patrons, the Towbes Foundation of Santa Barbara, California, and the Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation.

Ephemera: Fragments from Cranbrook’s Social Life
April 22, 2014 – September 28, 2014

Often referred to as the transient evidence of everyday life, ephemera spans the entire range of printing and social history. Because the Cranbrook Archives’ collection of ephemera is so rich and varied, this exhibition focuses on ephemera that illustrates Cranbrook’s social life during the 20th century.

Ranging from printed matter for theatrical productions, family and alumni reunions, school athletic events, and more, these documents present a visually compelling story of the way in which the Cranbrook community has represented its preoccupations, cultural perceptions, and identity over the past century. This is the first of several exhibitions that will feature ephemera from the collections of the Cranbrook Archives.

Ephemera: Fragments that Document Cranbrook’s Social Life was organized by the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research and curated by Head Archivist Leslie S. Edwards. The Center, which includes Cranbrook Archives, is supported, in part, by its Charter Patrons, the Towbes Foundation of Santa Barbara, California, and the Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation.

Hours and Pricing

Museum Hours:
June – August
Wednesday – Sunday, 11am – 5pm

September – May
Tuesday – Friday, 10am – 5pm
Saturday – Sunday, 11am – 5pm

Closed: New Year’s Eve & Day, Easter Sunday, Memorial Day, 4th of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve & Day.

Admission :
ArtMembers and Children 12 & under, Always Free
General: $8
Seniors (65+): $6
Students with ID: $4

Accessibility:
Barrier free access to the galleries of Cranbrook Art Museum can be accommodated through the adjacent New Studios Building. Visitors with disabilities are encouraged to call the Front Desk of the Art Museum at 248-645-3320 during regular museum hours for assistance. If you are planning your visit in advance, you may also call the Art Museum Administrative Offices at 248-645-3319 (Monday through Friday, 9 am-5pm) for additional information.

About Cranbrook Art Museum
Cranbrook Art Museum is located at 39221 Woodward Avenue, on the campus of Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills. It is an integral part of Cranbrook Academy of Art, a community of Artists-in-Residence and graduate-level students of art, design, and architecture. The Art Museum, which was established in 1930 and opened in its current building in 1942, is Eliel Saarinen’s final masterwork at Cranbrook. Today, the Art Museum presents original exhibitions and educational programming on modern and contemporary architecture, art, crafts, and design, as well as traveling exhibitions, films, workshops, travel tours, and lectures by renowned artists, designers, artists, and critics throughout the year. In 2011, the Art Museum completed a three-year $22 million construction project that includes both the restoration of the Saarinen-design building and a new state-of-the-art Collections Wing addition. Cranbrook Archives and the offices of the new Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research also are located within the Art Museum. For more information, visit www.cranbrook.edu.

 

Cranbrook Art Museum and Anders Ruhwald Announced as Finalists for Knight Arts Challenge Detroit Grants

Cranbrook Art Museum and Artist-in-Residence and Head of the Ceramics Department, Anders Ruhwald, were recently announced as finalists in the Detroit Knight Arts Challenge, which looks to award millions to local organizations focused on expanding the arts in the city of Detroit.

This is the second year of the challenge. Last year, the first of three for the Detroit Knight Arts Challenge, the contest awarded $2.1 million to 56 ideas – including four projects involving Academy alumni with awards totaling $200,000.

This year, the Knight Foundation received close to 1,000 applications which they were able to narrow down to 88 finalists. Winners will be announced in October.

Open to everyone, the Knight Arts Challenge offers matching grant money to the best ideas for the arts. Applicants must follow only three rules: 1) The idea must be about the arts; 2) The project must take place in or benefit Detroit; 3) The grant recipient must find funds to match Knight’s commitment.

The challenge is part of a $19.25 million investment in the Detroit arts that the Knight Foundation announced in the fall of 2012.

This year’s nominated projects include:

Cranbrook Art Museum: To mount performance artist Nick Cave’s “Biggest, Baddest Performance of All Time!” – a series of spectacles around the city in 2015. This program will coincide with a Nick Cave exhibition scheduled to open at Cranbrook Art Museum in June of 2015.

Anders Ruhwald: To explore the transformative qualities of fire – both destructive and constructive –  Ruhwald looks to create “The Charred House,” a permanent art installation inside a Detroit home where the interior is made of charred wood and black ceramics.

For more information, visit www.knightarts.org.

Cranbrook Academy of Art Presents The J. Robert F. Swanson Lectures: David Adjaye and Gregg Pasquarelli

DavidBloomfield Hills, Mich., April 22, 2014 – Cranbrook Academy of Art welcomes two leading figures in the world of architecture for the J. Robert F. Swanson Lecture Series.

The first speaker is David Adjaye, OBE, one of the leading architects of his generation, who will join us on April 25 at 4pm.

Adjaye is the founder of architectural firm Adjaye Associates, which has offices in London, Berlin, New York, Accra and Shanghai. The firm holds commissions for projects around the world, including the Nobel Peace Centre in Oslo (2005),  the Moscow School of Management Skolkov (2010), the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver (2007), and two public libraries in Washington, D.C. (2012).

In 2009, a team led by Adjaye was selected to design the new $360 million Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Adjaye is currently a visiting professor of architecture and design at Yale. He was awarded the OBE for services to architecture in 2007, received the Design Miami/ Year of the Artist title in 2011 and the Wall Street Journal Innovator Award in 2013. Special thanks to Jane Schulak and Culture Lab Detroit for helping to bring Adjaye to Cranbrook.

GreggThen, on May 5 at 6pm, we will be joined by Gregg Pasquarelli, AIA,
Principal of SHoP Architects and SHoP Construction. Pasquarelli is one of seven principals at SHoP, helping to oversee a team of 160 architects and designers who have created projects such as the Barclays Center in New York and Google’s offices in Mountain View, California. Just this year, SHoP was named “Most Innovative Architecture Firm in the World” by Fast Company magazine.

In addition to his work with SHoP, Pasquarelli is a fellow of the National Academy, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Architectural League of New York.  He has served as the Saarinen Professor of Architecture at Yale University, and has also held teaching positions at Columbia University, the University of Virginia, Syracuse University, and the University of Florida. Gregg’s commitment as not only a practitioner but as an educator demonstrates his dedication to impacting his field, challenging a new generation of architects to understand that innovative and beautiful architecture, and technological proficiency are not mutually exclusive.

About the J. Robert F. Swanson Lecture at Cranbrook Academy of Art
The J. Robert F. Swanson Lecture Fund at Cranbrook Academy of Art was established in 1983 by the family of J. Robert F. Swanson, a noted architect who was also the son-in-law of Eliel Saarinen. Each year, the Swanson Lecture brings to the Cranbrook campus architects, designers, artists or scholars who have received critical acclaim for their work and enjoy a sustained record of excellence and achievement in their respective field.  J. Robert F. Swanson and his wife and lifelong design partner, Pipsan Saarinen Swanson, founded their firm Swanson Associates in 1947 and worked on many exteriors and interiors, including residences, schools, universities, churches, airports, banks, and government, industrial and commercial projects.

Each lecture will be held in de Salle Auditorium at Cranbrook Art Museum. Admission is included with Museum admission, and free to students with identification.

Cranbrook Academy of Art
Cranbrook Academy of Art is the country’s top ranked, graduate-only program in architecture, design and fine art. Each year, just 75 students are invited to study and live on our landmark Saarinen-designed campus, which features private studios, state-of-the art workshops, a renowned Art Museum, and 300 acres of forests, lakes, and streams, all a short drive from the red-hot art, design, and music scene of Detroit. The focus at Cranbrook is on studio practice in one of ten disciplines: Architecture, 2D and 3D Design, Ceramics, Fiber, Metalsmithing, Painting, Photography, Print Media, and Sculpture. The program is anchored by celebrated Artists- and Designers-in-Residence, one for each discipline, all of whom live and practice on campus alongside our students. For more information, visit us at www.cranbrookart.edu.

Cranbrook Opens Its Doors to Showcase Graduate Work and Work Spaces

2014 Graduate Degree Exhibition of Cranbrook Academy of Art and OPEN(STUDIOS) Art Sale + Community Day Return

Bloomfield Hills, Mich., March 27, 2014 – The 2014 Graduate Degree Exhibition of Cranbrook Academy of Art opens to the public on April 22, and will showcase work from the next generation of architects, artists and designers who are shaping the future of art and design. The exhibition features pieces that are the culmination of two years of studio work from a diverse group of 75 graduates. The exhibition will run from April 22 – May 11, 2014.

Visitors can see installations such as an outdoor chandelier composed entirely of small bags of water, participate in an interactive virtual video work based on their movements in the gallery and experience a self-activated mechanical arm that brings speakers directly to the listener.

The exhibition will fill the entire 15,000 square feet of Cranbrook Art Museum and surrounding grounds. It is the most diverse exhibition offered all year as it showcases work from across all of the Academy’s 10 departments – 2D and 3D Design, Architecture, Ceramics, Fiber, Metalsmithing, Painting, Photography, Print Media, and Sculpture.

OPEN(STUDIOS) Is Back!

Then on April 27, after you see the work in the exhibition, go inside the Academy’s private studio spaces at our third annual OPEN(STUDIOS) Art Sale + Community Day. This is the only time of the year when the public is invited inside the private studio spaces of today’s emerging artists and designers. Student artists and faculty from each of the Academy’s 10 departments will be on hand to discuss their work and show off their creative environment. Select pieces of student art will be for sale.

Each OPEN(STUDIOS) ticket not only includes admission to the Art Museum, but also to the Institute of Science and a voucher for future admission to Cranbrook Gardens. Participate in hands-on art and science activities for the whole family, have lunch at a mini food truck rally and more!

The 2014 Graduate Degree Exhibition of Cranbrook Academy of Art and OPEN(STUDIOS) are sponsored by Mercedes-Benz Financial Services USA LLC, as part of their ongoing commitment to supporting emerging artists of all ages.

Hours and Pricing

2014 Graduate Degree Exhibition of Cranbrook Academy of Art
April 22 – May 11, 2014
*ArtMembers Opening Reception on April 19, 2014 from 6-8pm. Memberships can be purchased at the door.

Museum Hours (through May 11, 2014):
Tuesday – Friday: 10am – 5pm
Saturday – Sunday: 11am – 5pm
Admission to the Art Museum is $8 for adults; $6 for Senior Citizens; and $4 for full-time students with ID. Admission is free for ArtMembers@Cranbrook and children 12 and under.

Academy student-led tours will be held every Tuesday-Friday at noon and every Saturday and Sunday at 1pm. No tours will be held on April 20 and May 9.

OPEN(STUDIOS)
Art Sale + Community Day
April 27, 1 – 5pm

Tickets are $12 online (by April 26) and $15 at the door. Children 12 and under are free. No strollers in the studios, and children must be accompanied at all times. Admission to Cranbrook Art Museum, Cranbrook Institute of Science and a voucher for an upcoming tour of Cranbrook Gardens is included. To purchase tickets online, and for parking information, visit here. Event will be held, rain or shine. For more information, please contact 248.645.3214 or email artevents@cranbrook.edu.

For high resolution photos of students at work, please email jfracker@cranbrook.edu.

Cranbrook Academy of Art
Cranbrook Academy of Art is the country’s top ranked, graduate-only program in architecture, design and fine art. Each year, just 75 students are invited to study and live on our landmark Saarinen-designed campus, which features private studios, state-of-the art workshops, a renowned Art Museum, and 300 acres of forests, lakes, and streams, all a short drive from the red-hot art, design, and music scene of Detroit. The focus at Cranbrook is on studio practice in one of 10 disciplines: 2D and 3D Design, Architecture, Ceramics, Fiber, Metalsmithing, Painting, Photography, Print Media, and Sculpture. The program is anchored by celebrated Artists- and Designers-in-Residence, one for each discipline, all of whom live and practice on campus alongside our students. For more information, visit us at www.cranbrookart.edu.

New Curator of Contemporary Art and Design

Bloomfield Hills, Mich., Nov. 21, 2013 – Cranbrook Art Museum is pleased to announce the appointment of Laura Mott as Cranbrook’s new Curator of Contemporary Art and Design. Mott will be responsible for the Art Museum’s exhibition programs as well as the development and presentation of its collection of modern and contemporary art, architecture, and design.

“Laura is an artist’s curator,” says Gregory Wittkopp, Director of Cranbrook Art Museum and the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research. “She is a professional for whom working directly with artists and the objects they make is at the core of her work.”

Wittkopp continues, “With an innovative curatorial practice that has been based in both the United States and Europe, Mott’s exhibitions and writing have demonstrated her ability to actively engage the public with the work of an impressive range of contemporary artists, architects, musicians, and choreographers.”

Mott began her career in New York working with curator Lawrence Rinder on the Whitney Museum of American Art’s 2002 Biennial exhibition and publication, followed by experience in the commercial art world at the Peter Freeman gallery in New York. After attending graduate school at the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, Mott then moved to San Francisco where she served as the Curator/Assistant Director of Mission 17, a not-for-profit institution. Among other projects, she oversaw Mission 17’s Visual/Cultural Criticism Residency, as well as a curatorial internship and lecture program.

In 2009, Mott moved to Sweden where she was the Curator of Exhibitions at the University of Gothenburg’s Valand Academy. During her three years there, she worked closely with undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students in the fine arts department and developed an ambitious exhibition program for the university’s Galleri Rotor, establishing it as one of Gothenburg’s premier spaces for contemporary art. She also was part of the team than ran the Valand Artistic Research Centre’s artists-in-residence program, and organized and hosted a series of weekly lectures and academic seminars.

During her tenure at the Valand Academy, Mott also served as an interim Curator at the Gothenburg Konsthall, where she curated the seminal exhibition Everything Under Heaven is Total Chaos by the artists’ collective International Festival, and was a Guest Producer/Curator at Iaspis, an international artists residency program in Stockholm.

Mott taught several courses on exhibition-making at Valand Academy, and served as a guest lecturer at the university’s School of Photography and School of Design and Craft, as well as Dômens Art Academy in Gothenburg, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Moscow, and the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague, where she conceived and taught the seminar The Life of an Artwork: From Idea to Extinction.

Mott is a graduate of the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, New York, where she received an MA in Curatorial Studies, and the University of Texas, where she received both a BFA in Art History and a BA in Studio Art. Laura Mott began her new post at Cranbrook Art Museum on November 18.

About Cranbrook Art Museum
Cranbrook Art Museum is located at 39221 Woodward Avenue, on the campus of Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills. It is an integral part of Cranbrook Academy of Art, a community of Artists-in-Residence and graduate-level students of art, design and architecture. The Art Museum, which was established in 1930 and opened in its current building in 1942, is Eliel Saarinen’s final masterwork at Cranbrook. Today, the Art Museum presents original exhibitions and educational programming on modern and contemporary architecture, art, crafts, and design, as well as traveling exhibitions, films, workshops, travel tours, and lectures by renowned artists, designers, artists, and critics throughout the year. In 2011, the Art Museum completed a three-year $22 million construction project that includes both the restoration of the Saarinen-design building and a new state-of-the-art Collections Wing addition. Cranbrook Archives and the offices of the new Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research also are located within the Art Museum. For more information, visit www.cranbrook.edu.

For a high resolution photo of Mott, please contact Julie Fracker at jfracker@cranbrook.edu.

 

Image Credit: Lindsay Vila

Cranbrook Art Museum Installs Skate Ramp at Modern Skate Park in Royal Oak

Skaters encouraged to leave their mark; surface will be removed and installed in Museum as part of new exhibition

Video

BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich., Oct. 29, 2013 – Cranbrook Art Museum just completed the installation of a new half-pipe skate ramp at Modern State Park in Royal Oak. Skaters are encouraged to use the ramp over the next few weeks and leave their mark, then the surface will be peeled away and it will become part of the Museum’s new exhibition, My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process, which opens on November 16.

The exhibition examines the work of 22 artists from around the world as they show how the act of drawing impacts both artistic and scientific thinking. This project is directed by Chemi Rosado-Seijo, an artist whose History on Wheels project is an ongoing exploration of the correlation between skateboarding and artistic practice.

The ramp was built by Cranbrook Academy of Art graduate Mark Dineen (3D ’13) to Rosado-Seijo’s exact specifications, the dimensions of which refer to his own body measurements.

According to Rosado-Seijo, his skate-drawings bear individually determined traces of a region: the color of the earth, the dirt of the streets and the specific local skating techniques. The abstract marks of the skater’s wheels, deck and body seem random yet they are highly site-specific.

The ramp will be available for the public to use until Nov. 12 (regular Modern Skate admission hours and rates apply) – at which time the surface will be peeled away by Rosado-Seijo and installed at Cranbrook Art Museum. It will measure more than 25 feet in length.

Interactive and live performances are an integral part of My Brain Is in My Inkstand. Artist Tony Orrico will conduct a live public performance at Cranbrook Art Museum from Nov. 15-18, creating a drawing with his body that will remain in the Museum as part of the exhibition. Artist and composer Tristan Perich will also install a live Machine Drawing that uses mechanics and code to cumulatively etch markings across a Museum wall.

For the full press release of all exhibitions opening on November 16, click here. To see the ramp in action, click here.

Modern Skate Park is located at 1500 N. Stephenson Highway in Royal Oak, Michigan.

My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process is organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Nina Samuel. Cranbrook Art Museum gratefully acknowleges the support of Modern Skate Park and its owner George Leichtweis.

My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process Opens at Cranbrook Art Museum in November

For Immediate Release
Julie Fracker
Cranbrook Academy of Art & Art Museum
Office: 248.645.3329
Cell: 248.770.1721
jfracker@cranbrook.edu

My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process
Opens at Cranbrook Art Museum in November

Bloomfield Hills, Mich., October 17, 2013 – On November 16, 2013, Cranbrook Art Museum will open a new season of exhibitions examining how the act of drawing impacts both artistic and scientific thinking.

Through the new major exhibition, My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process, and the accompanying traveling exhibition, The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot: Fractals, Chaos, and the Materiality of Thinking, Cranbrook Art Museum will examine how sketches on paper are the first materialized traces of an idea, and how they are used as an instrument to make a meandering thought concrete.

An exhibition examining the work of Cranbrook’s first Resident Ceramic Sculptor, Waylande Gregory: Art Deco Ceramics and the Atomic Impulse, will also open on November 16.

With an opening weekend full of live performances and work from artists and scientists, a basketball coach and skateboarder, a biologist and even Native American Indians, the exhibitions promise to take you on a journey, demonstrating that if you can think it you can do it – but first you must draw it.

 

My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process
November 16, 2013 – March 30, 2014

An original new exhibition organized by Cranbrook Art Museum brings together 22 artists from around the world to redefine the notion of drawing as a thinking process in the arts and sciences alike.

Inspired by the accompanying exhibition The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot, the exhibition uses multiple sources to show how drawings reveal the interdependency of mark making and thinking. Featured artists include John Cage, Front Design, legendary basketball coach Phil Jackson, Mark Lombardi, Tony Orrico, Tristan Perich, Ruth Adler Schnee, Carolee Schneemann, and many more practitioners from around the world (click here for a complete list). The exhibition will also incorporate work from the collections of Cranbrook Institute of Science and the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research.

Artist Tony Orrico (pictured above) will conduct a live public performance from 11am – 3pm on both Saturday, November 16 and Sunday, November 17 as he continues a three-day process of creating a drawing that will remain in the Museum for the duration of the exhibition. Artist and composer Tristan Perch will install a live Machine Drawing that uses mechanics and code to cumulatively etch markings across a Museum wall.

The title of the exhibition derives from a quotation by American philosopher, mathematician and scientist Charles Sanders Peirce, whose work involving the over- and under-laying of mathematical formulas with pictographic drawings will be presented for the first time.

Organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by independent curator Nina Samuel.

 

The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot: Fractals, Chaos, and the Materiality of Thinking
November 16, 2013 – March 30, 2014

Focusing on the work of mathematician Benoît Mandelbrot (1924 – 2010), this exhibition explores the role of images in scientific thinking. Featuring works on paper, photographs, objects, and films, viewers can take an inside look at aspects of a new world of ideas that became popularly known as fractal geometry and chaos theory.


Organized by the Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, Design History, Material Culture, New York, and curated by independent curator Nina Samuel.

 

Waylande Gregory: Art Deco Ceramics and the Atomic Impulse
November 16, 2013 – March 23, 2014

Waylande Gregory (1905 – 1971) was one of the leading figures in 20th-century American ceramics, helping shape Art Deco design in the United States. In 1931 and 1932, he served as Resident Ceramic Sculptor at Cranbrook Academy of Art, and helped develop the Academy’s ceramics program. Although he worked at Cranbrook for only 18 months, Gregory produced several well-known sculptures here, including Kansas Madonna and Girl with Olive, both of which are featured in the exhibition.

Organized and circulated by the University of Richmond Museums, Virginia, and curated by independent ceramics scholar Dr. Thomas C. Folk.


Opening Weekend Activities

Visit during the opening weekend and take part in activities, live performances, talks and demonstrations designed to bring the act of drawing to life.

Friday, November 15

Become an ArtMember to take part in these exclusive events. Memberships may be purchased at the Front Desk.

ArtMembers’ Opening Reception: 6-8pm
Meet six of the artists in the exhibition, and curators Nina Samuel and Thomas Folk.

Artist Tony Orrico will conduct a live performance from 6-8pm in the Main Gallery, as he begins the three-day process of creating a drawing that will remain in the Museum for the duration of the exhibition.

From 8-8:30pm, enjoy a rare musical performance by artist and composer Tristan Perich, whose live Machine Drawing will also be activated that night.
__________

Saturday, November 16

Exhibition Opens to the General Public: 11am – 5pm
Tony Orrico continues his live drawing performance, from 11am-3pm in the Main Gallery.

Lecture Marathon: Noon – 5pm
All lectures take place in deSalle Auditorium and are included with regular Museum admission and free for ArtMembers and students with identification.

Corrie Van Sice (Creative Researcher)
Noon

“Cultural Amnesia: Synthetic Biology and the Mechanism of Life”

David Bowen (Studio Artist and Educator)
1pm

“Computing Natural Phenomena”

Chemi Rosado Seijo (Artist and Skateboarder)
2pm

“Art and the Urban Landscape”

Tristan Perich (Artist and Composer)
3pm

“Machine Drawings and the Visual Composition”

Tony Orrico (Visual and Performance Artist)
4pm

“State of Readiness: The Body as an Art Apparatus”

__________

Sunday, November 17

Tony Orrico continues his live drawing performance, from 11am-3pm in the Main Gallery.

Lecture by Thomas Folk (Curator and Ceramics Historian)
4pm

“Waylande Gregory: Art Deco Ceramics and the Atomic Impulse”

__________

Tuesday, November 19

Lecture by Nina Samuel (Curator and Art and Science Historian)
6pm

“My Brain is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process”

__________

Hours and Admission
Academic Year Hours (September through June):
Tuesday – Friday, 10am – 5pm
Saturday and Sunday, 11am – 5pm
Closed Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve and Day, and New Year’s Eve and Day

Admission:
ArtMembers and Children 12 & under, Always Free
General: $8
Seniors (65+): $6
Students with ID: $4

Accessibility:
Barrier free access to the galleries of Cranbrook Art Museum can be accommodated through the adjacent New Studios Building. Visitors with disabilities are encouraged to call the Front Desk of the Art Museum at 248-645-3320 during regular museum hours for assistance. If you are planning your visit in advance, you may also call the Art Museum Administrative Offices at 248-645-3319 (Monday through Friday, 9am– 5pm) for additional information.

About Cranbrook Art Museum
Cranbrook Art Museum is located at 39221 Woodward Avenue, on the campus of Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills. It is an integral part of Cranbrook Academy of Art, a community of Artists-in-Residence and graduate-level students of art, design and architecture. The Art Museum, which was established in 1930 and opened in its current building in 1942, is Eliel Saarinen’s final masterwork at Cranbrook. Today, the Art Museum presents original exhibitions and educational programming on modern and contemporary architecture, art, crafts, and design, as well as traveling exhibitions, films, workshops, travel tours, and lectures by renowned artists, designers, artists, and critics throughout the year. In 2011, the Art Museum completed a three-year $22 million construction project that includes both the restoration of the Saarinen-design building and a new state-of-the-art Collections Wing addition. Cranbrook Archives and the offices of the new Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research also are located within the Art Museum. For more information, visit www.cranbrook.edu.

 

Images: Tony Orrico. Photo by Bill E. Meyers. Courtesy of the artist and UB Art Gallery.

Benoît Mandelbrot. Scribbled arrows showing the technique of magnifications of details. Computer-generated prints with scribbles. Collection Aliette Mandelbrot.

Gregory Waylande, Water, 1938, from the Fountain of the Atom, New York World’s Fair, 1939. Collection of Cranbrook Art Museum, partial gift of Patricia Shaw. Photography by R. H. Hensleigh and Tim Thayer.