Cranbrook Opens Its Doors to Showcase Graduate Work and Work Spaces

STUDIO 2015

Photos by Harrison Möenich (Photography ’16)

2015 Graduate Degree Exhibition of Cranbrook Academy of Art and OPEN(STUDIOS) Art Sale + Community Day Return

Bloomfield Hills, Mich., April 9, 2015 – The 2015 Graduate Degree Exhibition of Cranbrook Academy of Art opens to the public with a special ArtMembers’ Opening Reception on April 18, and will showcase work from the next generation of architects, artists and designers who are shaping the future of art and design. The exhibition features pieces that are the culmination of two years of studio work from a diverse group of 69 graduates. The exhibition opens to the public on April 19 and will run through May 10, 2015.

The exhibition will fill nearly the entire 15,000 square feet of Cranbrook Art Museum and surrounding grounds. It is the most diverse exhibition offered all year as it showcases work from across all of the Academy’s 10 departments – 2D and 3D Design, Architecture, Ceramics, Fiber, Metalsmithing, Painting, Photography, Print Media, and Sculpture.

OPEN(STUDIOS)
Art Sale + Community Day
Sunday, April 26, 1 – 5pm

Then on Sunday, April 26, go inside the Academy’s private studio spaces at our fourth annual OPEN(STUDIOS) Art Sale + Community Day. This is the only time of the year when the public is invited inside the private studio spaces of today’s emerging artists and designers. Student artists and faculty from each of the Academy’s 10 departments will be on hand to discuss their work and show off their creative environment. Select pieces of student art will be for sale.

Each OPEN(STUDIOS) ticket not only includes admission to the Art Museum, but also to the Institute of Science and a voucher for future admission to Cranbrook Gardens. Participate in hands-on activities for the whole family, have lunch at a mini food truck rally and more!

Tickets for OPEN(STUDIOS) are $12 online (by April 24) and $15 at the door. Children 12 and under are free. No strollers in the studios, and children must be accompanied at all times. To purchase tickets online, visit our website. Event will be held, rain or shine.

The Graduate Degree Exhibition and OPEN(STUDIOS) are sponsored by: Mercedes-Benz Financial Svcs

For high resolution photos of students at work, please email Julie Fracker at jfracker@cranbrook.edu.

Hours and Pricing

2015 Graduate Degree Exhibition of Cranbrook Academy of Art
April 19 – May 10, 2015
ArtMembers Opening Reception: April 18, 2015 from 6-8pm
Memberships may be purchased at the door.

Museum Hours:

September – May
Tuesday – Friday, 10am – 5pm
Saturday – Sunday, 11am – 5pm

June – August
Wednesday – Sunday, 11am – 5pm

Closed: New Year’s Eve & Day, Easter Sunday, Memorial Day, 4th of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve & Day.

Admission:
ArtMembers and Children 12 & under, Always Free
General: $8
Seniors (65+): $6
Students with ID: $4

Accessibility:
Barrier free access to the galleries of Cranbrook Art Museum can be accommodated through the adjacent New Studios Building. Visitors with disabilities are encouraged to call the Front Desk of the Art Museum at 248-645-3320 during regular museum hours for assistance. If you are planning your visit in advance, you may also call the Art Museum Administrative Offices at 248-645-3319 (Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm) for additional information.

Cranbrook Academy of Art
Cranbrook Academy of Art is the country’s top ranked, graduate-only program in architecture, design and fine art. Each year, just 75 students are invited to study and live on our landmark Saarinen-designed campus, which features private studios, state-of-the art workshops, a renowned Art Museum, and 300 acres of forests, lakes, and streams, all a short drive from the red-hot art, design, and music scene of Detroit. The focus at Cranbrook is on studio practice in one of 10 disciplines: 2D and 3D Design, Architecture, Ceramics, Fiber, Metalsmithing, Painting, Photography, Print Media, and Sculpture. The program is anchored by celebrated Artists- and Designers-in-Residence, one for each discipline, all of whom live and practice on campus alongside our students. For more information, visit us at www.cranbrookart.edu.

Contact:
Julie Fracker
Cranbrook Academy of Art
248.645.3329
jfracker@cranbrook.edu

Cranbrook Art Museum and Nick Cave Announce “Nick Cave: Here Hear”

Photo by James Prinz Photography. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Photo by James Prinz Photography. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York


Seven-month project includes Museum exhibition and Cave’s “Biggest, Baddest Performance Series!”

Bloomfield Hills, Mich., March 30, 2015 – This spring, summer, and fall, Cranbrook Art Museum and Detroit will serve as the backdrop for Nick Cave’s most ambitious project to date – Nick Cave: Here Hear. At the invitation of Cranbrook Art Museum, Cave will stage seven months of events throughout the city of Detroit anchored by his first solo exhibition in Michigan at Cranbrook Art Museum, opening this summer. Nick Cave is an artist and dancer, famous for his sculptures, called Soundsuits, which he often stages in public spectacle.

The events will kick off in April, when Nick begins “invading” the city of Detroit for a series of site-specific photo shoots. His first stop will be on the Peristyle at Cranbrook Art Museum at noon on April 10. Cave will be dressed in one of his iconic Soundsuits giving the public the rare opportunity to see the artist dressed in a suit himself. He will continue to “pop up” at locations throughout the city of Detroit in April and May – the Dequindre Cut, the Brightmoor neighborhood, the Parade Company, Mexicantown, the African Bead Museum, Eastern Market, The Fisher Building, One Woodward Avenue and many more. Follow Cranbrook Art Museum on Facebook and Twitter for clues about his locations and the opportunity to see Cave in action at some of these locations. The photographs will be published as a book this summer, titled Nick Cave: Greetings from Detroit, depicting the positive creativity of the city.

The exhibition at Cranbrook Art Museum will open to the public on June 20 and run through October 11, 2015. It will include a collection of approximately 30 sculptural Soundsuits in the main gallery, offset by a room of seven newly commissioned artworks surrounded by a wall-based tapestry inspired by Cave’s childhood watching the night sky. An additional gallery will feature a selection of his recent sculpture work and a projection room of the artist’s video work. Finally, the “Map in Action” room will serve as a hub for the Detroit Performance Series and display the wearable Soundsuits that will come and go to performances throughout the city of Detroit. Video footage of the performances will be added to the room throughout the duration of the show, thereby becoming a living document of the entire project.

A full weekend of celebrations are planned for the exhibition opening, including a film screening and block party performance in Detroit’s Brightmoor and Old Redford communities on Sunday, June 21 at both the historic Redford Theatre and The Artist Village.

Cave will be using his time in Detroit to engage the area in a philosophy he calls “collective dreaming.” Cave is a 1989 graduate of Cranbrook Academy of Art, and he has said the time he spent in Detroit was critical to his growth as an artist. He is returning to capture the excitement currently captivating the city. “My goal,” says the artist, “is to work with these groups and those who live in and love the city to reimagine Detroit as an always-surprising environment of creativity, excitement, and engagement. My dreams for the city are big, because I believe it is important for Detroit to be dreaming ambitiously at this moment about its own future.”

In addition to the exhibition, Cave will use the city of Detroit to stage his largest performance series to date. He will design Dance Labs in partnership with the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD); work with LBGTQ young adults from the Ruth Ellis Center in Highland Park to create the performance Up Right Detroit, and work with students from the Detroit School of Arts and the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy for Heard•Detroit, a procession of as many as 30 life-size horse sculptures operated by 60 high school dancers that will parade along Detroit’s riverfront on Saturday, September 26. Cave’s project will culminate at the end of the exhibition in October, when the artist will stage Figure This: Detroit, a massive public performance at Detroit’s Masonic Temple on Sunday, October 4.

Though influenced by a vibrant palette of African art, armor, found objects, and fashion and textile design, Cave’s Soundsuits are rooted in social critique. Cave first created a suit in the aftermath of the Rodney King beatings in 1991, envisioning an emotional shield that protects one’s race or gender while still expressing individuality.

“Nick Cave’s return begins with his past connection to the city, but it is fueled by an enthusiasm for the future of Detroit,” says Cranbrook Art Museum Curator of Contemporary Art and Design Laura Mott. “This ambitious project is sited in many different neighborhoods and communities throughout the city and it is part of Cave’s mission to ignite Detroit’s collective imagination. Nick Cave chose the title—Here Hear—because it speaks to both the place and an act of engagement, and together they form a triumphant cheer.”

According to Cave, “the exhibition at Cranbrook is a way to recognize and celebrate the richness in the city of Detroit. The idea of rebuilding and repurposing is very much in line with what I do as an artist.”

Cranbrook Art Museum Director Gregory Wittkopp says this project highlights Cranbrook’s plans to continue to connect its international exhibition program with the city of Detroit, and also to highlight work from alumni of Cranbrook Academy of Art. “We’ve made a special effort over the past two years to bring more emerging and contemporary artists into our exhibitions, with a focus on Detroit-based artists and graduates from Cranbrook Academy of Art,” Wittkopp says. “The Nick Cave project not only fulfills both goals, it knocks them out of the park.”

The project will also include “Nick Cave: Exploring Identity through the Arts,” a K-12 curriculum for educators that will be available online without charge. It will encourage students to explore social and cultural issues relevant to their personal and community identity through the arts. Cranbrook Art Museum will also offer costume workshops and camps inspired by the work of Nick Cave during the summer months.

This project has attracted a wide variety of sponsors and community partners who are eager to share Cranbrook Art Museum’s desire to spread creative positivity throughout Detroit. The Presenting Sponsors are the Ford Foundation and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, who through their Knight Arts Challenge Detroit initiative look to fund ideas that engage and enrich Detroit through the arts. Cranbrook Art Museum received a matching grant of $150,000 to kick-off this ambitious project. According to Dennis Scholl, vice president of arts for Knight Foundation, “Detroit’s future is being driven by the cultural creatives who have big ideas for their city. It’s an honor to help bring visual artist Nick Cave back to the Michigan, to engage many more people in thinking creatively about their lives, their neighborhoods, their Detroit.”

Leadership Sponsors include Quicken Loans with their Opportunity Detroit mission and The Kresge Foundation. The Major Sponsor is The Taubman Foundation. Supporting Sponsors include Strategic Staffing Solutions, the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs and the National Endowment for the Arts, the Masco Corporation Foundation, Maggie and Bob Allesee, and the Jack Shainman Gallery. Community Partners include the Detroit RiverFront Conservancy, the Ruth Ellis Center, Detroit School of Arts and the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit.

The ambitious schedule of events for Nick Cave: Here Hear, includes:

April 10: Nick Cave will give a public appearance performing in a Soundsuit on the Peristyle outside of Cranbrook Art Museum at noon.
April 10-15; May 1-5: Nick Cave Soundsuit “invasion” photo shoots in Detroit.
June 19: Nick Cave: Here Hear ArtMembers and Sponsors exhibition preview.
June 20: Nick Cave: Here Hear opens to the public at Cranbrook Art Museum
June 21: Celebration and performance at the historic Redford Theatre, followed by a celebration at The Artist Village, engaging the Brightmoor, Old Redford and Northwest Detroit communities. These events will be free and open to the public.
July 2015: Up Right Detroit: a performance with participants from the Ruth Ellis Center. Conceived by Nick Cave as an “act of initiation” and a preparation of the mind, body, spirit, and selfhood, a group of African-American men will undergo a ritual of being costumed in elaborate Soundsuits, before they reenter the city, transformed. The site, date and format will be determined by funding initiatives.
July/August 2015: Cranbrook Art Museum will partner with the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD) to present three Dance Labs designed by Nick Cave. He will pair three local dance companies with three groups of musicians to create their own choreographed works with his extraordinary Soundsuits. The rehearsals at MOCAD will be open to viewers, and the free public performances will be staged in locations throughout the city. Dates and times to be announced.
September 26, 2015: As a continuation of his renowned performance series, Nick Cave will present Heard•Detroit as a partnership between Cranbrook Art Museum, The Detroit RiverFront Conservancy and The Detroit School of Arts. The project will feature a procession of as many as 30 life-size horse sculptures operated by 60 high-school dancers along the Detroit riverfront. A dreamlike vision that stops everyday life for a collective transformative moment, Heard•Detroit will be performed by talented dancers and musicians attending the Detroit School of Arts, one of four magnet schools in the Detroit Public School system. The performance along the riverfront will be free and open to the public.
October 4, 2015: The culmination of the project will be Figure This: Detroit, a large-scale performance comprised of the dances and music from the Dance Labs, a presentation by children of their Cave-inspired creations, and the artist’s new artwork Up Right Detroit. This final performance will be a free event in Detroit’s Masonic Temple for an audience of hundreds.

About Cranbrook Art Museum
Cranbrook Art Museum is located at 39221 Woodward Avenue, on the campus of Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills. It is an integral part of Cranbrook Academy of Art, a community of Artists-in-Residence and graduate-level students of art, design, and architecture. Cranbrook Art Museum was established in 1930 and opened in its current building in 1942. The building is considered Eliel Saarinen’s final masterwork at Cranbrook. Today, the Art Museum presents original exhibitions and educational programming on modern and contemporary architecture, art, crafts, and design, as well as traveling exhibitions, films, workshops, travel tours, and lectures by renowned artists, designers, artists, and critics throughout the year. In 2011, the Art Museum completed a three-year $22 million construction project that included both the restoration of the Saarinen-designed building and a new state-of-the-art Collections Wing addition. Cranbrook Archives and the offices of the new Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research also are located within the Art Museum. For more information, visit www.cranbrook.edu.

Cranbrook Academy of Art Welcomes Kenneth Frampton on March 12

Kenneth-FramptonBloomfield Hills, Mich., March 2, 2015 – Cranbrook Academy of Art is delighted to welcome legendary British architect Kenneth Frampton to campus for a public lecture on Thursday, March 12.

Frampton trained as an architect at the Architectural Association School of Architecture, London. After practicing for a number of years in the United Kingdom and in Israel, he served as the editor of the British magazine Architectural Design. He is currently the Ware Professor of Architecture at the GSAPP, Columbia University, New York.

He is the author of Modern Architecture and the Critical Present (1980), Studies in Tectonic Culture (1995), American Masterworks (1995), Le Corbusier (2001), Labour, Work & Architecture (2005), and an updated fourth edition of Modern Architecture: A Critical History (2007).

Frampton will deliver his lecture “A Genealogy of Modern Architecture” on Thursday, March 12, at 6pm in deSalle Auditorium at Cranbrook Art Museum. His lecture will discuss a new book that looks at a series of buildings analyzed in pairs for the differentiated values which are incorporated in their forms.

Frampton’s lecture is sponsored by the J. Robert F. Swanson Lecture Fund.

About the J. Robert F. Swanson Lecture at Cranbrook Academy of Art
The J. Robert F. Swanson Lecture Fund at Cranbrook Academy of Art was established in 1983 by the family of J. Robert F. Swanson, a noted architect who was also the son-in-law of Eliel Saarinen. Each year, the Swanson Lecture brings to the Cranbrook campus architects, designers, artists or scholars who have received critical acclaim for their work and enjoy a sustained record of excellence and achievement in their respective field. J. Robert F. Swanson and his wife and lifelong design partner, Pipsan Saarinen Swanson, founded their firm Swanson Associates in 1947 and worked on many exteriors and interiors, including residences, schools, universities, churches, airports, banks, and government, industrial and commercial projects.

All lectures are free to ArtMembers and students with identification. For the general public, they are included with Museum admission. The Museum galleries will be open prior to each lecture. Parking is available in the Cranbrook Art Museum parking lot and in the parking deck next to the Institute of Science.

Cranbrook Academy of Art
Cranbrook Academy of Art is the country’s top ranked, graduate-only program in architecture, design and fine art. Each year, just 75 students are invited to study and live on our landmark Saarinen-designed campus, which features private studios, state-of-the art workshops, a renowned Art Museum, and 300 acres of forests, lakes, and streams, all a short drive from the red-hot art, design, and music scene of Detroit. The focus at Cranbrook is on studio practice in one of ten disciplines: Architecture, 2D and 3D Design, Ceramics, Fiber, Metalsmithing, Painting, Photography, Print Media, and Sculpture. The program is anchored by celebrated Artists- and Designers-in-Residence, one for each discipline, all of whom live and practice on campus alongside our students. For more information, visit us at www.cranbrookart.edu.

Cranbrook Art Museum Presents Bent, Cast, and Forged: The Jewelry of Harry Bertoia

Ornamental Centipede. Harry Bertoia, Circa 1942, Hammered brass. Gift of George Gough Booth and Ellen Scripps Booth through The Cranbrook Foundation.CAM 1943.12. Photo by R. H. Hensleigh and Tim Thayer.

Ornamental Centipede. Harry Bertoia, Circa 1942, Hammered brass.
Gift of George Gough Booth and Ellen Scripps Booth through The Cranbrook Foundation.
CAM 1943.12.
Photo by R. H. Hensleigh and Tim Thayer.

 

BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich., February 10, 2015 – Cranbrook Art Museum is pleased to announce that the exhibition Bent, Cast, and Forged: The Jewelry of Harry Bertoia will open on March 14, 2015. This is the first Museum exhibition devoted exclusively to Harry Bertoia’s designs for jewelry. It will run through November 29, 2015.

The exhibition will open with an exclusive ArtMembers’ reception on March 13, from 6-8pm, featuring a lecture from Celia Bertoia, Harry Bertoia’s youngest daughter and director of the Harry Bertoia Foundation. Memberships will be available for purchase at the door that evening at half-price.


Bertoia (b. 1915 – d. 1978) is a graduate of Cranbrook Academy of Art and a former Metalsmithing instructor. He has received international acclaim for his woven wire metal furniture and large bronze and copper sculptures, but his earliest exploration of the medium originated in jewelry design while still a student at Cass Tech High School in Detroit in the 1930s. Out of the hundreds of jewelry pieces attributed to Bertoia, the majority were produced during his years at Cranbrook in the early 1940s.


Bent, Cast, and Forged: The Jewelry of Harry Bertoia will display 30 jewelry works – and offers an early glimpse of a creative vision that would crystallize as his career matured. Bertoia was a student at the Academy from 1937-39, and stayed on as a Metalsmithing instructor from 1939-1943. While showing an early talent for silver-plated tableware at Cranbrook, wartime rationing forced him to work on a smaller scale, creating jewelry from melted down metal scraps from the shop – including wedding rings for Cranbrook friends Charles and Ray Eames.

“Harry Bertoia’s artistic legacy is tremendous, and with the upcoming centennial of his birth in March 2015, we thought it auspicious timing for an exhibition devoted to his jewelry — the first of its kind in a museum setting,” said exhibition curator Shelley Selim, Cranbrook Art Museum’s 2013-2015 Jeanne and Ralph Graham Collections Fellow. “It is thrilling to see his investigations of form and material in his early days as an artist and designer.”


According to Selim, it was during his time at Cranbrook that he also began to produce his monotype prints, several of which will also be featured in the show, “to illustrate how the artist harnessed the same intuitive and experimental approach to making in his planographic compositions,” she says. “This examination of Bertoia’s jewelry is not only a case study of one facet of a versatile career, but also an exploration of process and creative discovery. Bertoia made jewelry as a way of working out his conceptual interests
 particularly the vital forces of nature and its cycle of growth and decay. The pieces in the show embody a developing visual language and artistic worldview that persevered and intensified throughout his entire career.”

This exhibition highlights Bertoia’s investigations of form, dimension, and material on a concentrated and bankable scale – establishing him as a pioneer of the American Studio Jewelry movement and a master of elevating fashionable adornment to objet d’art.


The exhibition features 30 objects in total, plus 13 monotype prints. In addition to the three works from Cranbrook’s own collection, there are pieces in the exhibition on loan from Renee Murphy, Kim and Al Eiber, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Leah Gordon Antiques, Drucker Antiques, and the estate of Lois Rosenthal.


Bent, Cast, and Forged: The Jewelry of Harry Bertoia was organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Shelley Selim, the Art Museum’s 2013-2015 Jeanne and Ralph Graham Collections Fellow. The exhibition is sponsored, in part, by Wright Auction House, Kim and Al Eiber, and the David Klein and Kate Ostrove Exhibition Fund. The exhibition will be accompanied by a full-color catalogue published by Cranbrook Art Museum.


Other Exhibitions Currently on Display at Cranbrook Art Museum
The Cranbrook Hall of Wonders: Artworks, Objects, and Natural Curiosities
Open through March 22, 2015
The Cranbrook Hall of Wonders draws its inspiration from the precursor to the modern museum: the “Cabinet of Curiosities” or “Wunderkammer,” a sixteenth-century collecting and display technique in which art, ornate functional objects, natural oddities, and anthropological discoveries co-existed together as a microcosm of knowledge. This contemporary interpretation is a floor-to-ceiling installation featuring Cranbrook Art Museum’s preeminent collection of artworks, design, and craft objects from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, exhibited alongside cultural properties from Cranbrook’s historic campus, and inspired selections from the vast holdings of Cranbrook Institute of Science.

Theater of the Mind
Open through March 29, 2015
Theater of the Mind is an exhibition that focuses on the imagination of the audience. The term “theater of the mind” is used to describe a strategy of self-hypnosis in which one visualizes oneself as an actor projected on a screen, thereby simultaneously becoming the protagonist and the audience. Similarly, the artists and designers in the exhibition have created works that are actualized in the viewer’s imagination and produce narratives that are not tangibly visible, yet lucid and vibrant.

The exhibition includes seminal artworks by Bruce Nauman, Roni Horn, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Anthony McCall, and design collective Dunne & Raby/Michael Anastassiades.
Theater of the Mind also features new work by Marcelline Delbecq, Detroit-based artist Adam Lee Miller, and an ambitious site-specific commission by Finnish artist Hans Rosenström, who created an immersive sound installation based on personal and archival research at Cranbrook.
MR. MDWST – A REAL GOOD TIME by BEVERLY FRE$H
Open through March 22, 2015
MR. MDWST is a continuation of the adventures of Beverly Fre$h—a stylized autobiographical character that doubles as an artist persona and stage name for Zack Ostrowski, a graduate of Cranbrook Academy of Art (2D ’09). Like a postmodern tale of the picaresque, Fre$h has traveled extensively over the last two years on a quest to understand, reconfigure, and interrupt the social constructs and cultural rituals of the rural Midwest. He created impromptu, site-oriented performances alone and with strangers at carnivals, country fairs, front yards, and back roads, which were recorded for a documentary titled
The Outskirts (2014).  This exhibition presents a series of new works inspired by his performative research in the region and features four character tropes he met during his travels: The Badass, The Innocent, The Professional, and The Seeker.

Hours and Pricing

Museum Hours:

September – May
Tuesday – Friday, 10am – 5pm
Saturday – Sunday, 11am – 5pm

June – August
Wednesday – Sunday, 11am – 5pm
Closed: Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve & Day, New Year’s Eve & Day, Easter Sunday, Memorial Day, 4th of July and Labor Day.

Admission :
ArtMembers and Children 12 & under, Always Free
General: $8
Seniors (65+): $6
Students with ID: $4

Accessibility:
Barrier free access to the galleries of Cranbrook Art Museum can be accommodated through the adjacent New Studios Building. Visitors with disabilities are encouraged to call the Front Desk of the Art Museum at 248-645-3320 during regular museum hours for assistance. If you are planning your visit in advance, you may also call the Art Museum Administrative Offices at 248-645-3319 (Monday through Friday, 9 am-5pm) for additional information.

Cranbrook Art Museum is supported, in part, by its membership organization, ArtMembers@Cranbrook; the Museum Committee of Cranbrook Art Museum; and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs and the National Endowment for the Arts.

About Cranbrook Art Museum
Cranbrook Art Museum is located at 39221 Woodward Avenue, on the campus of Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills. It is an integral part of Cranbrook Academy of Art, a community of Artists-in-Residence and graduate-level students of art, design, and architecture. The Art Museum, which was established in 1930 and opened in its current building in 1942, is Eliel Saarinen’s final masterwork at Cranbrook. Today, the Art Museum presents original exhibitions and educational programming on modern and contemporary architecture, art, crafts, and design, as well as traveling exhibitions, films, workshops, travel tours, and lectures by renowned artists, designers, artists, and critics throughout the year. In 2011, the Art Museum completed a three-year $22 million construction project that includes both the restoration of the Saarinen-design building and a state-of-the-art Collections Wing addition. Cranbrook Archives and the offices of the new Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research also are located within the Art Museum. For more information, visit www.cranbrook.edu.

For high-resolution photos, email Julie Fracker at jfracker@cranbrook.edu.

Cranbrook Art Museum Presents MR. MDWST – A REAL GOOD TIME by BEVERLY FRE$H

MR. MDWST
BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich., January 21, 2015 – As part of a new series showcasing emerging contemporary artists, Cranbrook Art Museum welcomes Cranbrook Academy of Art graduate Zack Ostrowski for his new exhibition MR. MDWST – A REAL GOOD TIME by BEVERLY FRE$H.

The exhibition will open with an exclusive ArtMembers’ reception and performance on February 6, 2015, from 6-8pm. Memberships can be purchased at the door the evening of the event. The exhibition opens to the public on February 7 and runs through March 22, 2015.

MR. MDWST (a truncation of Mister Midwest) is a continuation of the adventures of Beverly Fre$h—a stylized autobiographical character that doubles as an artist persona and stage name for Zack Ostrowski.

Like a postmodern tale of the picaresque, Ostrowski has traveled extensively over the last two years as Beverly Fre$h on a quest to understand, reconfigure, and interrupt the social and cultural rituals of the rural Midwest. He created impromptu, site-oriented performances alone and with strangers at carnivals and country fairs, and in front yards and on back roads, which were recorded for the documentary The Outskirts (2014).

This exhibition screens video documentation from the series and presents new works inspired by his performative research in the Midwest region. In the gallery, Ostrowski has designed three wildly-creative stage sets for new performances inspired by four character tropes he met during his travels: The Badass, The Innocent, The Professional, and The Seeker.

“I am interested in the peripheral elements of our contemporary culture and seek to understand and highlight their imperfect and misunderstood manifestations,” says Ostrowski. “I use alternative strategies to examine cultural structures through a variety of media, including drawing, graphic design, installation, rap, folk music, and performance.”

According to Laura Mott, Curator of Contemporary Art and Design at Cranbrook Art Museum, “This year we’ve made a special effort to bring in more emerging or mid-career contemporary artists, with a focus on Detroit-based artists and graduates from Cranbrook Academy of Art. Zack Ostrowski is a native Detroiter, CAA alum, and one of the most energetic and fearless artists I have met in recent years—a perfect fit for this initiative.”

Mott continues, “Within moments of my first studio visit with him, I was completely blown away by his radical approach to performance, sculpture and design, with his references ranging from comedy, performance art, rap music, amateur theater, and contemporary theory.  He has spent the last few years on an incredible quest throughout the Midwest, and his work and persona has evolved significantly during the process.  The MR. MDWST exhibition is a significant part of the journey as it creates a stage for this exploration within the contemporary art and museum context.”

As part of the exhibition, Ostrowski will stage a series of public performances. These performances all take place against and on top of the sculptural stage he has created in the Art Museum.  The performances include:

MR. MDWST by BEVERLY FRE$H
Friday, February 6 at 6:30pm: Premiere at the ArtMembers’ Opening Reception
Sunday, February 8 at 5pm: Encore performance following a series of afternoon lectures
“MR. MDWST” is a forty-minute performance created from documentation and field notes taken during phase one of “OUTSKIRTS,” an ongoing series of site-oriented performances to understand, reconfigure, and interrupt the social and cultural rituals of the rural Midwest. Building on the tradition of the “one man show,” “MR. MDWST,” aims to both entertain and challenge the audience by drawing from the field of oral tradition and exploring devices that allow cultural material to be transmitted such as songs, jokes, sayings, and stories.

AFTER LAUGHTER Presented by BEVERLY FRE$H, Featuring Lynne West
Sunday, March 1 from 12:30pm-1:30pm

Beverly Fre$h presents “AFTER LAUGHTER” a guided session in Laughter Yoga (Hasyayoga) conducted by certified Laughter Yoga Leader Lynne West, “The Mistress of Mirth.” This afternoon workshop will explore the various methods and benefits of prolonged voluntary laughter. There will be no complicated poses, just laughter and a real good time. Comfortable clothing and yoga mat suggested.

LANGUAGE IS A HOUSE Presented by BEVERLY FRE$H, Featuring Bry’n Lambert
Sunday March 1 from 4:30-5pm

“LANGUAGE IS A HOUSE” is an inspirational keynote presentation that wanders the unsteady ground between nightmare and ecstasy. Inspired by Heidegger’s claim that “language is a house in which man dwells,” this program demonstrates how language calls together our basic exigencies and builds a place for us to reside. In this presentation, Beverly Fre$h will introduce Bry’n Lambert, a former reporter who has reinvented himself as a visionary real estate agent. Bry’n will take the audience down his path of reinvention and present some of his latest concepts. This event is open to the public – real estate agents,architects, contractors, and interior designers are especially encouraged to attend.

Note: On March 1, between Ostrowski’s two performances, Cranbrook Art Museum will host the Ann Arbor Film Festival from 2-4pm. 

Zack Ostrowski was raised in Detroit and currently lives and works in Chicago. He has a BFA in Graphic Design/Interactive Media from the College for Creative Studies in Detroit and an MFA from the 2D Department at Cranbrook Academy of Art, where he was the 2009 recipient of the Daimler AG Emerging Artist Award. He is an Assistant Professor and Area Head of Graphic Art at DePaul University. He has exhibited and performed throughout the United States and internationally, including in China, Japan, Peru, Poland, Ukraine, Czech Republic, and Germany.

MR. MDWST was organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Laura Mott, Curator of Contemporary Art and Design, with additional support provided by De Paul University.  The exhibition is part of an ongoing series that presents the work of vibrant emerging and mid-career contemporary artists with a special focus on graduates of Cranbrook Academy of Art and Detroit-based artists.

Other Exhibitions Currently on Display at Cranbrook Art Museum

Hall of WondersThe Cranbrook Hall of Wonders: Artworks, Objects, and Natural Curiosities
Open through March 22, 2015
The Cranbrook Hall of Wonders draws its inspiration from the precursor to the modern museum: the “Cabinet of Curiosities” or “Wunderkammer,” a sixteenth-century collecting and display technique in which art, ornate functional objects, natural oddities, and anthropological discoveries co-existed together as a microcosm of knowledge. This contemporary interpretation is a floor-to-ceiling installation featuring Cranbrook Art Museum’s preeminent collection of artworks, design, and craft objects from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, exhibited alongside cultural properties from Cranbrook’s historic campus, and inspired selections from the vast holdings of Cranbrook Institute of Science.

Theater of the MindTheater of the Mind
Open through March 29, 2015
Theater of the Mind is an exhibition that focuses on the imagination of the audience. The term “theater of the mind” is used to describe a strategy of self-hypnosis in which one visualizes themself as an actor projected on a screen, thereby simultaneously becoming the protagonist and the audience. Similarly, the artists and designers in the exhibition have created works that are actualized in the viewer’s imagination and produce narratives that are not tangibly visible, yet lucid and vibrant.

The exhibition includes seminal artworks by Bruce Nauman, Roni Horn, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Anthony McCall, and design collective Dunne & Raby/Michael Anastassiades. Theater of the Mind also features new work by Marcelline Delbecq, Detroit-based artist Adam Lee Miller, and an ambitious site-specific commission by Finnish artist Hans Rosenström, who created an immersive sound installation based on personal and archival research at Cranbrook.

Coming Soon to Cranbrook Art Museum

Bertoia jewelryBent, Cast and Forged: The Jewelry of Harry Bertoia
March 14 – November 29, 2015
Art Members’ Opening Reception:  Friday, March 13, 2015

In commemoration of the centennial of the artist’s birth, Bent, Cast, and Forged: The Jewelry of Harry Bertoia is the first museum exhibition devoted to Harry Bertoia’s designs for jewelry. The former Cranbrook Academy of Art student and metalsmithing instructor has received international acclaim for his metal furniture and sculpture, but his exploration of the medium originated in jewelry design while still a high school student in Detroit. Out of the hundreds of jewelry pieces attributed to Bertoia, the majority was produced during his years at Cranbrook, and this display of over thirty works offers an early glimpse of a creative vision that would crystallize as his career matured.

Additionally, several early monotype prints are featured to illustrate how the artist harnessed the same intuitive and experimental approach to making in his planographic compositions. The objects in this exhibition highlight Bertoia’s investigations of form, dimension, and material on a concentrated and bankable scale—establishing him as a pioneer of the American Studio Jewelry movement and a master of elevating fashionable adornment to objet l’art.

Bent, Cast, and Forged: The Jewelry of Harry Bertoia was organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Shelley Selim, the Art Museum’s 2013-2015 Jeanne and Ralph Graham Collections Fellow. The exhibition is sponsored, in part, by Wright Auction House, Kim and Al Eiber, and the David Klein and Kate Ostrove Exhibition Fund. The exhibition will be accompanied by a full-color catalogue published by Cranbrook Art Museum.

Graduate Exhibition2015 Graduate Degree Exhibition of Cranbrook Academy of Art
April 19 – May 10, 2015
Opening Reception: Saturday, April 18, 2015, 6-8pm

The most innovative art and design being produced in the area takes over the entire 15,000 square feet of Cranbrook Art Museum for our annual Graduate Degree Exhibition of Cranbrook Academy of Art. See the culmination of two years of studio work from 70 of today’s most promising artists, architects, and designers.

Nick-CaveNick Cave: Here Hear
June 20 – October 11, 2015
Art Members’ Opening Reception:  Friday, June 19, 2015

Artist Nick Cave is famed for his embellished costumes titled Soundsuits staged in public spectacle. The artist conceives some as fragile sculptural totems, and others as wearable costumes designed for sound, mobility, and dance.

The vision for the exhibition at Cranbrook Art Museum includes a collection of Soundsuits, new sculptures and newly commissioned artworks arranged in dynamic vignettes throughout the galleries, one of which will feature a site-specific wall-based tapestry inspired by Cave’s childhood watching the night sky.  In an additional gallery, a Map in Action room will display the wearable Soundsuits that will come and go for performances during the exhibition period to locations throughout the city. Videos of the performances will be added to the room throughout the duration of the show, thereby becoming a living document of the entire project.

Cranbrook Art Museum received a Knight Arts Challenge Detroit grant, an initiative of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, for the project: Nick Cave’s Biggest, Baddest Performance of All Time!  The performance series for Nick Cave: Here Hear includes impromptu flash-mob Soundsuit Invasions throughout the city; Dance Labs at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD); a new performance work by the artist; Heard Detroit with Detroit student dancers; costuming workshops with children; and the grand finale of it all, Figure This: Detroit, a legend-making performance downtown for an audience of thousands.
Hours and Admission Fees

Museum Hours:

September – May
Tuesday – Friday, 10am – 5pm
Saturday – Sunday, 11am – 5pm
Closed: New Year’s Eve & Day, Easter Sunday, Memorial Day, 4th of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve & Day.

June – August
Wednesday – Sunday, 11am – 5pm

Admission:
ArtMembers and Children 12 & under, Always Free
General: $8
Seniors (65+): $6
Students with ID: $4

Accessibility:
Barrier free access to the galleries of Cranbrook Art Museum can be accommodated through the adjacent New Studios Building. Visitors with disabilities are encouraged to call the Front Desk of the Art Museum at 248-645-3320 during regular museum hours for assistance. If you are planning your visit in advance, you may also call the Art Museum Administrative Offices at 248-645-3319 (Monday through Friday, 9 am-5pm) for additional information.

About Cranbrook Art Museum
Cranbrook Art Museum is located at 39221 Woodward Avenue, on the campus of Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills. It is an integral part of Cranbrook Academy of Art, a community of Artists-in-Residence and graduate-level students of art, design, and architecture. The Art Museum, which was established in 1930 and opened in its current building in 1942, is Eliel Saarinen’s final masterwork at Cranbrook. Today, the Art Museum presents original exhibitions and educational programming on modern and contemporary architecture, art, crafts, and design, as well as traveling exhibitions, films, workshops, travel tours, and lectures by renowned artists, designers, artists, and critics throughout the year. In 2011, the Art Museum completed a three-year $22 million construction project that includes both the restoration of the Saarinen-design building and a state-of-the-art Collections Wing addition. Cranbrook Archives and the offices of the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research also are located within the Art Museum. For more information, visit www.cranbrook.edu.

Cranbrook Art Museum receives funding from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs and the National Endowment for the Arts.

For high-resolution photos, email Julie Fracker at jfracker@cranbrook.edu.

Cranbrook Art Museum Announces New Exhibition Series: The Cranbrook Hall of Wonders, Theater of the Mind, and Iris Eichenberg: Bend

November exhibitionsBLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich., Oct. 29, 2014 – Cranbrook Art Museum announces an ambitious new series of exhibitions today, designed to captivate the imagination, showcase the depth of the collections on Cranbrook’s campus, and highlight the pioneering work of Cranbrook Academy of Art’s Metalsmithing Artist-in-Residence.

The Cranbrook Hall of Wonders: Artworks, Objects, and Natural Curiosities draws its inspiration from sixteenth-century “Cabinet of Curiosities” or “Wunderkammers,” and will showcase art, natural oddities, and anthropological discoveries side-by-side – pulling items from the collections of both the Art Museum and Institute of Science. Theater of the Mind focuses on the imagination of the audience, with light and sound installations accompanying artworks from a broad range of artists, including Hans Rosenström, Anthony McCall, Bruce Nauman, Roni Horn, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and others. And Iris Eichenberg: Bend is Cranbrook Art Museum’s first solo exhibition featuring Cranbrook Academy of Art Metalsmithing Artist-in-Residence, Iris Eichenberg, and is a new body of work inspired by her 25-year career as a contemporary jewelry artist.

“The three exhibitions at Cranbrook Art Museum present a dynamic spectrum of artwork, design, and objects,” says Laura Mott, Curator of Contemporary Art and Design. “The Museum’s offerings range in date from newly-commissioned contemporary artwork to centuries-old natural objects. Together, the exhibitions allow for experiences of discovery and rediscovery, and delight for the senses and the imagination.”

The ArtMembers’ Opening Reception for all exhibitions is Saturday, November 22, from 6-8:30pm. Iris Eichenberg will deliver an exhibition introduction at 6pm, followed by exhibition previews with the curators and artists from 6:30-7:30pm. A celebration with live music will follow from 7:30-8:30pm. The general public will be able to attend the opening by purchasing a membership, which will be discounted by 50 percent that evening. The exhibitions open to the public on Sunday, November 23, and include a special lecture at 1pm by Hans Rosenström, who is unveiling new work in the Theater of the Mind exhibition created especially for Cranbrook.

Hall of WondersThe Cranbrook Hall of Wonders: Artworks, Objects, and Natural Curiosities
November 23, 2014 – March 22, 2015

The Cranbrook Hall of Wonders draws its inspiration from the precursor to the modern museum: the “Cabinet of Curiosities” or “Wunderkammer,” a sixteenth-century collecting and display technique in which art, ornate functional objects, natural oddities, and anthropological discoveries co-existed together as a microcosm of knowledge. This contemporary interpretation is a floor-to-ceiling installation featuring Cranbrook Art Museum’s preeminent collection of artworks, design, and craft objects from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, exhibited alongside cultural properties from Cranbrook’s historic campus, and inspired selections from the vast holdings of Cranbrook Institute of Science.

From the sculpture of Claes Oldenburg to antique navigational tools; from Arts and Crafts pottery to taxidermied animals, The Cranbrook Hall of Wonders combines seemingly disparate objects to explore new avenues of display and context, shaping compelling vignettes that—in the spirit of its Renaissance-era predecessors—seek to captivate, provoke, and amaze.

The exhibition will be accompanied by the Acts of Curiosity: Exhibition and Performance Series, a monthly program of events in which invited contemporary artists and scholars will respond to the installation with performances or “exhibitions-within-the-exhibition,” placing objects in unexpected new contexts with their own items of equal fascination. The schedule includes:

Sunday, December 14, 2014, 4pm:  Exhibition by artist Marie T. Hermann (Detroit) and mass-hypnotism performed by artist Marcos Lutyens (Los Angeles)

Thursday, January 29, 2015, 6pm:  Exhibition by designer Jack Craig (Detroit) and lecture on the history of the Wunderkammer by Jennifer Nelson (Ann Arbor), Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Michigan

Friday, February 6, 2015, 6-8pm: Exhibition by sculptor Patrick Hill (Detroit)

Friday, March 6, 2015, 7pm: Performance by dancer Biba Bell (Detroit) with musician Robert Aiki Aubrey Lowe (New York)

The Cranbrook Hall of Wonders: Artworks, Objects, and Natural Curiosities was organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Laura Mott, Curator of Contemporary Art and Design, and Shelley Selim, 2013–2015 Jeanne and Ralph Graham Collections Fellow. The exhibition was designed by Mark Baker, Head Preparator and Exhibition Designer. 

Theater of the MindTheater of the Mind
November 23, 2014 – March 29, 2015

Theater of the Mind is an exhibition that focuses on the imagination of the audience. The term “theater of the mind” is used to describe a strategy of self-hypnosis in which one visualizes themself as an actor projected on a screen, thereby simultaneously becoming the protagonist and the audience. Similarly, the artists and designers in the exhibition each have created works that are actualized in the viewer’s imagination and produce narratives that are not tangibly visible, yet lucid and vibrant.

The exhibition includes seminal artworks by Bruce Nauman, Roni Horn, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Anthony McCall, and design collective Dunne & Raby/Michael Anastassiades. Theater of the Mind also features new work by Marcelline Delbecq, Detroit-based artist Adam Lee Miller, and an ambitious site-specific commission by Finnish artist Hans Rosenström, who will create an immersive sound installation based on personal and archival research at Cranbrook.

Theater of the Mind was organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Laura Mott, Curator of Contemporary Art and Design. Hans Rosenström’s installation is supported, in part, through grants from the Finlandia Foundation National and Frame Visual Art Finland. 

Iris EichenbergIris Eichenberg: Bend
November 23, 2014 – January 25, 2015

Bend is a solo exhibition by contemporary jewelry artist Iris Eichenberg, Artist-in-Residence and Head of the Metalsmithing Department at Cranbrook Academy of Art.  As a point of departure, Eichenberg revisited her artistic practice; the result is an unconventional retrospective of her 25-year career told through a body of new work. Decades in the making, this exhibition is an introspective look at the alchemic process of creation and the artist’s life-long research into the behavior of materials.

The exhibition’s title, Bend, speaks to the language of the body and the artist’s material choices—gold, brass, rusted steel, textile, and mirrored glass—as well as Eichenberg’s circuitous path as a jewelry artist. Eichenberg has described her process as “drawing in materials” and for this exhibition she has sketched on a more monumental scale. The exhibition features life-size enlargements of work the artist previously executed though the jewelry-making process, thereby becoming sculptural anomalies that enact the body and ornament at the same time.

Iris Eichenberg: Bend was organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Laura Mott, Curator of Contemporary Art and Design. It is sponsored, in part, by the Jeanne and Ralph Graham Exhibition Fund. The accompanying exhibition catalog, which will be available for purchase at the front desk, is supported, in part, through a grant from the Rotasa Foundation.

Coming to Cranbrook Art Museum in 2015

MR. MDWSTMDWST – A REAL GOOD TIME by BEVERLY FRE$H
February 7 – March 22, 2015
Art Members’ Opening Reception:  Friday, February 6

MDWST (a truncation of Mister Midwest) is a continuation of the adventures of Beverly Fre$h—a stylized autobiographical character that doubles as an artist persona and stage name for Zack Ostrowski, a graduate of Cranbrook Academy of Art (2D ’09). Like a postmodern tale of the picaresque, Fre$h has traveled extensively over the last two years on a quest to understand, reconfigure, and interrupt the social constructs and cultural rituals of the rural Midwest.  He created impromptu, site-oriented performances alone and with strangers at carnivals, country fairs, front yards, and back roads, which were recorded for a documentary titled The Outskirts (2014).  This exhibition presents a series of new works inspired by his performative research in the region and features four character tropes he met during his travels: The Badass, The Innocent, The Professional, and The Seeker.

Mr. Mdwst – A Real Good Time by Beverly Fre$H was organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Laura Mott, Curator of Contemporary Art and Design.  The exhibition is part of an ongoing series that presents the work of vibrant emerging and mid-career contemporary artists with a special focus on graduates of Cranbrook Academy of Art and Detroit-based artists.

Bertoia jewelryThe Jewelry of Harry Bertoia
March 14 – October 11, 2015
Art Members’ Opening Reception:  Friday, March 13, 2015

Former Cranbrook Academy of Art student and metalsmithing instructor Harry Bertoia (1915–1978) has received international acclaim for his metal furniture and sculpture, but his exploration of the medium originated in jewelry design. Out of the hundreds of jewelry works attributed to Bertoia, the majority was produced during his years at Cranbrook, offering an early glimpse of a creative vision that would crystallize as his career matured. The Jewelry of Harry Bertoia examines the artist’s experimentations with form, dimension, and fabrication on a concentrated and bankable scale—establishing Bertoia as a pioneer of the American Studio Jewelry movement and a master of elevating fashionable adornment to objet l’art.

The Jewelry of Harry Bertoia was organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Shelley Selim, the Art Museum’s 2013-2015 Jeanne and Ralph Graham Collections Fellow. The exhibition is sponsored, in part, by Wright Auction House, Kim and Albert Eiber, and the David Klein and Kate Ostrove Exhibition Fund. The exhibition will be accompanied by a full-color catalogue published by Cranbrook Art Museum.

Graduate Exhibition2015 Graduate Degree Exhibition of Cranbrook Academy of Art
April 19 – May 10, 2015
Opening Reception: Saturday, April 18, 2015,
6-8pm

The most innovative art and design being produced in the area takes over the entire 15,000 square feet of Cranbrook Art Museum for our annual Graduate Degree Exhibition of Cranbrook Academy of Art. See the culmination of two years of studio work from approximately 70 of today’s most promising artists, architects, and designers.

 

Nick-CaveNick Cave: Here Hear
June 20 – October 11, 2015
Art Members’ Opening Reception:  Friday, June 19, 2015

Artist Nick Cave is famed for his embellished costumes titled Soundsuits staged in public spectacle. The artist conceives some as fragile sculptural totems, and others as wearable costumes designed for sound, mobility, and dance.

The vision for the exhibition at Cranbrook Art Museum includes a collection of Soundsuits, new sculptures and newly commissioned artworks arranged in dynamic vignettes throughout the galleries, one of which will feature a site-specific wall-based tapestry inspired by Cave’s childhood watching the night sky.  In an additional gallery, a Map in Action room will display the wearable Soundsuits that will come and go for performances during the exhibition period to locations throughout the city. Videos of the performances will be added to the room throughout the duration of the show, thereby becoming a living document of the entire project.

Cranbrook Art Museum received a Knight Arts Challenge Detroit grant, an initiative of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, for the project: Nick Cave’s Biggest, Baddest Performance of All Time! The performance series for Nick Cave: Here Hear includes impromptu flash-mob Soundsuit Invasions throughout the city; Dance Labs at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD); a new performance work by the artist; Heard Detroit with Detroit student dancers; costuming workshops with children; and the grand finale of it all, Figure This: Detroit, a legend-making performance downtown for an audience of thousands.

Nick Cave: Here Hear was organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Laura Mott, Curator of Contemporary Art and Design.

Hours and Pricing

Museum Hours:

September – May
Tuesday – Friday, 10am – 5pm
Saturday – Sunday, 11am – 5pm

June – August
Wednesday – Sunday, 11am – 5pm
Closed: Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve & Day, New Year’s Eve & Day, Easter Sunday, Memorial Day, 4th of July and Labor Day.

Admission :
ArtMembers and Children 12 & under, Always Free
General: $8
Seniors (65+): $6
Students with ID: $4

Accessibility:
Barrier free access to the galleries of Cranbrook Art Museum can be accommodated through the adjacent New Studios Building. Visitors with disabilities are encouraged to call the Front Desk of the Art Museum at 248-645-3320 during regular museum hours for assistance. If you are planning your visit in advance, you may also call the Art Museum Administrative Offices at 248-645-3319 (Monday through Friday, 9 am-5pm) for additional information.

Cranbrook Art Museum is supported, in part, by its membership organization, ArtMembers@Cranbrook; the Museum Committee of Cranbrook Art Museum; and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs and the National Endowment for the Arts.

About Cranbrook Art Museum
Cranbrook Art Museum is located at 39221 Woodward Avenue, on the campus of Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills. It is an integral part of Cranbrook Academy of Art, a community of Artists-in-Residence and graduate-level students of art, design, and architecture. The Art Museum, which was established in 1930 and opened in its current building in 1942, is Eliel Saarinen’s final masterwork at Cranbrook. Today, the Art Museum presents original exhibitions and educational programming on modern and contemporary architecture, art, crafts, and design, as well as traveling exhibitions, films, workshops, travel tours, and lectures by renowned artists, designers, artists, and critics throughout the year. In 2011, the Art Museum completed a three-year $22 million construction project that includes both the restoration of the Saarinen-design building and a state-of-the-art Collections Wing addition. Cranbrook Archives and the offices of the new Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research also are located within the Art Museum. For more information, visit www.cranbrook.edu.

For high-resolution photos, email Julie Fracker at jfracker@cranbrook.edu.

Cranbrook Art Museum and Nick Cave Announce “The Biggest, Baddest Performance of All Time!” Thanks to Support From Knight Arts Challenge Detroit

Photo by James Prinz Photography. Courtesy of the Artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Bloomfield Hills, Mich., Oct. 6, 2014 – Cranbrook Art Museum and artist Nick Cave will launch “The Biggest, Baddest Performance of All Time!” thanks to support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Knight Foundation announced today that Cranbrook Art Museum will receive a matching grant of $150,000 to mount the ambitious project, which will begin early next year and take place throughout 2015. The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation’s Knight Arts Challenge funds ideas that engage and enrich Detroit through the arts.

Cranbrook’s vision for the project includes impromptu flash mob Soundsuit invasions throughout the city, dance labs at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, a new performance by the artist filmed in Detroit, costuming workshops with children, and the culmination of it all, Figure This: Detroit, a massive processional and performance downtown.

This sweeping project will be undertaken in conjunction with Cave’s solo exhibition Here Hear, which will open at Cranbrook Art Museum on June 20, 2015 and run through October 11, 2015. The exhibition will be curated by Laura Mott, Cranbrook’s Curator of Contemporary Art and Design, who will also be coordinating the performances in Detroit.”

“This exhibition and the accompanying performances and events in Detroit will not only be Nick Cave’s ‘Biggest, Baddest Performance of All Time,’ but thanks to the Knight Foundation, whose team encouraged us to dream big, it will also be one of the most ambitious projects our Museum has ever undertaken. It not only celebrates one of Cranbrook Academy of Art’s most revered graduates, but also demonstrates Cranbrook’s commitment to the celebration and revitalization of Detroit,” says Gregory Wittkopp, Director of Cranbrook Art Museum and the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research.

“Few things bring people together like the arts. We hope these events touch many Detroiters and inspire them to think creatively about their lives and city,” said Dennis Scholl, vice president of arts for Knight Foundation.

Nick Cave is an African-American artist and dancer, famous for his embellished costumes, called Soundsuits, which he often stages in public spectacle. Though influenced by a vibrant palette of African art, armor, found objects, fashion and textile design, the Soundsuit are rooted in social critique. Cave first created a suit in the aftermath of the Rodney King beatings in 1991, envisioning an emotional shield that protects one’s race or gender while still expressing individuality.

“My connection to the city of Detroit began during graduate school when I attended Cranbrook Academy of Art in the late 1980s,” says Cave. “My extensive time spent in the city was also an important part of my education and growth as an artist. This ambitious performance and the educational components presented in this project are based on conversations with local artists, arts organizations, and non-profits, as well as my visceral experience of the incredible locations throughout different areas of Detroit.”

Cave continues, “My goal is to work with these groups and those who live in and love the city to reimagine Detroit as an always-surprising environment of creativity, excitement, and engagement. I began to dream big, because I believe it is important for Detroit to be dreaming ambitiously at this moment in regards to its own future.”

About the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation supports transformational ideas that promote quality journalism, advance media innovation, engage communities and foster the arts. The foundation believes that democracy thrives when people and communities are informed and engaged. For more, visit KnightFoundation.org.

About Cranbrook Art Museum
Cranbrook Art Museum is located at 39221 Woodward Avenue, on the campus of Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills. It is an integral part of Cranbrook Academy of Art, a community of Artists-in-Residence and graduate-level students of art, design, and architecture. The Art Museum, which was established in 1930 and opened in its current building in 1942, is Eliel Saarinen’s final masterwork at Cranbrook. Today, the Art Museum presents original exhibitions and educational programming on modern and contemporary architecture, art, crafts, and design, as well as traveling exhibitions, films, workshops, travel tours, and lectures by renowned artists, designers, artists, and critics throughout the year. In 2011, the Art Museum completed a three-year $22 million construction project that includes both the restoration of the Saarinen-design building and a new state-of-the-art Collections Wing addition. Cranbrook Archives and the offices of the new Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research also are located within the Art Museum. For more information, visit www.cranbrook.edu.

Warhol On Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987+ Opens at Cranbrook Art Museum

BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich., May 28, 2014 – Cranbrook Art Museum announces the opening of six new exhibitions that will debut with a weekend of celebration on June 20-22.

Beginning with the opening of Warhol On Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987+, the Museum will exhibit nearly 100 album covers, including variations of more than 50 unique designs by Andy Warhol throughout his career. Featured in the exhibitions will be the world-premiere of three album covers that have never before been exhibited, including a cover recently discovered last year. Cranbrook has also been loaned a copy of the one-of-a-kind “Night Beat” album cover, making this the most comprehensive exhibition of authenticated record covers to date. See every cover Warhol designed, from the iconic Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers to the extremely rare Giant Size $1.57 Each, his first Pop Art record cover.

The sculptural furniture of designer/craftsman and former Cranbrook Academy of Art student Paul Evans will be on display in Paul Evans: Crossing Boundaries and Crafting Modernism. And the multifunctional furniture and architectural units of Ken Isaacs will be showcased in Culture Breakers: The Living Structures of Ken Isaacs.

Follow the history of Cranbrook in film in Cranbrook Goes to the Movies: Films and Their Objects, 1925-1975, and study the lighter side of Cranbrook’s history in Ephemera: Fragments from Cranbrook’s Social Life.

And finally, explore Modernism through the contemporary works of Amie Siegel’s The Modernists and Terence Gower’s Ciudad Moderna.

“Cranbrook is widely recognized as the ‘cradle of Modernism,’ a history that we have reflected in our two most recent summer exhibitions, George Nelson: Architect | Writer | Designer | Teacher and Michigan Modern: Design that Shaped America,” says Gregory Wittkopp, Director of Cranbrook Art Museum and the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research. “This summer we are illuminating some of the lesser-known stories of mid-century Modernism, including two designers that studied or taught at Cranbrook: Paul Evans and Ken Isaacs. We will also look at Andy Warhol, who, although undeniably iconic, is not known for his designs for record covers. His story is one that can only be told here at Cranbrook. With the recent gift of this collection from Frank Edwards and Ann Williams, Cranbrook Art Museum now has the world’s most comprehensive collection of Warhol’s record covers, including several covers that have never been seen publicly.”

It all kicks off with the ArtMembers’ Opening Reception on June 20 from 6-10pm, featuring the music of NUCLASSICA and the Music Institute at Cranbrook. The exhibitions open to the public on June 21, and we’ll continue to celebrate with the PNC Bank Family Fun Celebration on June 22. See below for details about each exhibition and dates/times to join the fun. And check our website for a complete schedule of summer events.

Sunday, June 22
PNC Bank Family Fun Celebration!

Visit the Museum for a day full of music, food, and crafts as we celebrate the opening of our summer exhibitions.

11am – 5pm: Museum is open to the public.
11:30am – 4:30pm: Sugar Magnolia’s food truck will be serving sweets.
12:30pm, 1:30pm, 2:30pm, and 3:30pm: Thumbs Up! Michigan’s premier ukulele band will perform covers of Andy Warhol’s Velvet Underground.
1 – 4pm: Get inspired by Warhol On Vinyl, then watch as your limited-edition Cranbrook/Warhol T-shirt is made! Academy graduate Wes Taylor will be here to operate a six-arm T-shirt press while you watch. Extra cost for the purchase of the shirt.
1pm and 3pm: Tour the Art Deco masterwork Saarinen House.
Noon, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm and 4pm: Take an Exhibition Highlight Tour of our new shows.

Exhibition Details

Warhol On Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987+
June 21, 2014 – March 15, 2015

The exhibition is drawn from Cranbrook Art Museum’s preeminent collection of record covers by Andy Warhol, a recent gift by Frank M. Edwards and Ann M. Williams. The album covers range from the extremely rare to the widely recognizable; together they offer a unique lens to survey the artist’s career from a young graphic designer to a cultural phenomenon. At the same time, the exhibition documents the history of the mass-produced vinyl record and the zeitgeist of these eras through the inclusion of music, video, and artworks from the Museum’s extensive Andy Warhol collection, including nine prints, which are a recent gift from the Andy Warhol Foundation.

Listening booths in the gallery will allow viewers to play select albums, thereby producing an experience between the cover art and the music—rock, classical, opera, jazz, soul, experimental—the way Warhol intended. The exhibition also includes album covers by other musicians that have controversially appropriated Warhol’s imagery and testify to his influence on subsequent generations.

The world-premiere presentation of Warhol on Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949 – 1987+ was organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Curator of Contemporary Art and Design Laura Mott. The exhibition is sponsored by the Jeanne and Ralph Graham Exhibition Fund and the Clannad Foundation.

Paul Evans: Crossing Boundaries and Crafting Modernism
June 21, 2014 – October 12, 2014
In a new documentary, musician Lenny Kravitz says the work of Paul Evans is, “stunningly beautiful, stunningly ugly, stunningly tacky, stunningly sophisticated.” This exhibition is the first comprehensive survey of Evans’s work, documenting his role in the midcentury American studio furniture movement, his approach to furniture as sculpture and abstract composition, and his unremitting new approaches to metal.

Opening earlier this year at the Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, and then traveling to Cranbrook Art Museum—the only other venue for the exhibition—Paul Evans: Crossing Boundaries and Crafting Modernism will be comprised of 68 works, spanning the artist’s entire career. It includes choice examples of Evans’s early metalwork and jewelry, collaborative pieces made by Evans and Phillip Lloyd Powell during the 1950s when they shared a studio, as well as a comprehensive selection of Evans’s studio work representing his sculpted steel; verdigris copper; copper, bronze and pewter; argenté sculpted bronze, and cityscape techniques.

The show will also include examples of Evans’s sculpture and a selection of work he produced for Directional Furniture Company. The presentation at Cranbrook Art Museum will include work by Evans’s contemporaries selected from Cranbrook’s permanent collection, including the celebrated Shuey Collection, placing his pioneering designs for furniture with the context of concurrent trends in midcentury art and design. Evans studied Metalsmithing at Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1952 and 1953, working with Artist-in-Residence Richard Thomas.

Paul Evans: Crossing Boundaries and Crafting Modernism was organized by the James A. Michener Art Museum, Doylestown, Pennsylvania, and curated by Constance Kimmerle. The presentation at Cranbrook is supported, in part, by the David Klein and Kathryn Ostrove Exhibition Fund.

Culture Breakers: The Living Structures of Ken Isaacs
June 21 – October 5, 2014

Former Cranbrook Academy of Art student and instructor Ken Isaacs radically deconstructed conventional notions of modernism. His Living Structures—hand-made, low-cost, multifunctional furniture and architectural units—challenged ideas of how people could sit, work, and live within their own homes and the broader built environment.

Culture Breakers: The Living Structures of Ken Isaacs highlights Isaacs’s time in the 1950s at Cranbrook as both student and head of the Design Department, his experimentations as an educator with environmental learning, and his role within the countercultural community of the 1960s and 1970s, when he gained wider recognition for his populist approach to design.

Featuring works on paper, photographs, film, architectural models, and several reproduced Living Structures—this exhibition examines Isaacs’s role as a nonconformist who created simple, economical, functional systems of living that could be built by anyone. By spreading his designs through mass-instruction instead of mass-production, Isaacs encouraged a do-it-yourself outlook that empowered consumers through the act of making.

Organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Shelley Selim, Cranbrook Art Museum’s 2013-2015 Jeanne and Ralph Graham Collections Fellow.

Modern / Moderna: Amie Siegel and Terence Gower
June 21 – August 31, 2014

Modern/Moderna explores the societal and cultural trends of Modernism through two contemporary artworks. Amie Siegel’s The Modernists is a reassembled personal archive of found travel photographs and film footage of an unknown couple during the 1960s-1980s; it examines the domestic camera’s gendered relationship to sculpture, fashion, and our private/public selves. Terence Gower’s Ciudad Moderna, uses the popular 1966 Mexican film Despedida de Casada as source material of the contemporary city and re-edits the film to feature the architecture as the protagonist.

Organized by Cranbrook Art Museum and curated by Curator of Contemporary Art and Design Laura Mott.

Cranbrook Goes to the Movies: Films and Their Objects, 1925-1975
June 21, 2014 – November 30, 2014

Cranbrook and the camera grew up together. In the 1920s, as George and Ellen Booth were realizing their dream of a community dedicated to art, science, and education, amateur filmmaking flourished as a newly affordable hobby. These two historical trajectories intersect in Cranbrook Goes to the Movies.

The vintage films featured in this exhibition bring the diverse history of Cranbrook’s campus alive in a way never before experienced; through the actual people and objects that populated it. Cranbrook Goes to the Movies gives physical presence to the vintage films that document life at Cranbrook and places some of Cranbrook’s treasures in their historical context. An immersive experience, Cranbrook Goes to the Movies provides an avenue into Cranbrook’s past built not on dry text and static images but on the vitality and movements of the people who lived it.

Cranbrook Goes to the Movies: Films and Their Objects, 1925-1975 is organized by the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research and curated by the Center’s 2012-2014 Collections Fellow Shoshana Resnikoff. The Center, which includes Cranbrook Archives, is supported, in part, by its Charter Patrons, the Towbes Foundation of Santa Barbara, California, and the Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation.

Ephemera: Fragments from Cranbrook’s Social Life
April 22, 2014 – September 28, 2014

Often referred to as the transient evidence of everyday life, ephemera spans the entire range of printing and social history. Because the Cranbrook Archives’ collection of ephemera is so rich and varied, this exhibition focuses on ephemera that illustrates Cranbrook’s social life during the 20th century.

Ranging from printed matter for theatrical productions, family and alumni reunions, school athletic events, and more, these documents present a visually compelling story of the way in which the Cranbrook community has represented its preoccupations, cultural perceptions, and identity over the past century. This is the first of several exhibitions that will feature ephemera from the collections of the Cranbrook Archives.

Ephemera: Fragments that Document Cranbrook’s Social Life was organized by the Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research and curated by Head Archivist Leslie S. Edwards. The Center, which includes Cranbrook Archives, is supported, in part, by its Charter Patrons, the Towbes Foundation of Santa Barbara, California, and the Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation.

Hours and Pricing

Museum Hours:
June – August
Wednesday – Sunday, 11am – 5pm

September – May
Tuesday – Friday, 10am – 5pm
Saturday – Sunday, 11am – 5pm

Closed: New Year’s Eve & Day, Easter Sunday, Memorial Day, 4th of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve & Day.

Admission :
ArtMembers and Children 12 & under, Always Free
General: $8
Seniors (65+): $6
Students with ID: $4

Accessibility:
Barrier free access to the galleries of Cranbrook Art Museum can be accommodated through the adjacent New Studios Building. Visitors with disabilities are encouraged to call the Front Desk of the Art Museum at 248-645-3320 during regular museum hours for assistance. If you are planning your visit in advance, you may also call the Art Museum Administrative Offices at 248-645-3319 (Monday through Friday, 9 am-5pm) for additional information.

About Cranbrook Art Museum
Cranbrook Art Museum is located at 39221 Woodward Avenue, on the campus of Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills. It is an integral part of Cranbrook Academy of Art, a community of Artists-in-Residence and graduate-level students of art, design, and architecture. The Art Museum, which was established in 1930 and opened in its current building in 1942, is Eliel Saarinen’s final masterwork at Cranbrook. Today, the Art Museum presents original exhibitions and educational programming on modern and contemporary architecture, art, crafts, and design, as well as traveling exhibitions, films, workshops, travel tours, and lectures by renowned artists, designers, artists, and critics throughout the year. In 2011, the Art Museum completed a three-year $22 million construction project that includes both the restoration of the Saarinen-design building and a new state-of-the-art Collections Wing addition. Cranbrook Archives and the offices of the new Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research also are located within the Art Museum. For more information, visit www.cranbrook.edu.

 

Cranbrook Art Museum and Anders Ruhwald Announced as Finalists for Knight Arts Challenge Detroit Grants

Cranbrook Art Museum and Artist-in-Residence and Head of the Ceramics Department, Anders Ruhwald, were recently announced as finalists in the Detroit Knight Arts Challenge, which looks to award millions to local organizations focused on expanding the arts in the city of Detroit.

This is the second year of the challenge. Last year, the first of three for the Detroit Knight Arts Challenge, the contest awarded $2.1 million to 56 ideas – including four projects involving Academy alumni with awards totaling $200,000.

This year, the Knight Foundation received close to 1,000 applications which they were able to narrow down to 88 finalists. Winners will be announced in October.

Open to everyone, the Knight Arts Challenge offers matching grant money to the best ideas for the arts. Applicants must follow only three rules: 1) The idea must be about the arts; 2) The project must take place in or benefit Detroit; 3) The grant recipient must find funds to match Knight’s commitment.

The challenge is part of a $19.25 million investment in the Detroit arts that the Knight Foundation announced in the fall of 2012.

This year’s nominated projects include:

Cranbrook Art Museum: To mount performance artist Nick Cave’s “Biggest, Baddest Performance of All Time!” – a series of spectacles around the city in 2015. This program will coincide with a Nick Cave exhibition scheduled to open at Cranbrook Art Museum in June of 2015.

Anders Ruhwald: To explore the transformative qualities of fire – both destructive and constructive –  Ruhwald looks to create “The Charred House,” a permanent art installation inside a Detroit home where the interior is made of charred wood and black ceramics.

For more information, visit www.knightarts.org.

Cranbrook Academy of Art Presents The J. Robert F. Swanson Lectures: David Adjaye and Gregg Pasquarelli

DavidBloomfield Hills, Mich., April 22, 2014 – Cranbrook Academy of Art welcomes two leading figures in the world of architecture for the J. Robert F. Swanson Lecture Series.

The first speaker is David Adjaye, OBE, one of the leading architects of his generation, who will join us on April 25 at 4pm.

Adjaye is the founder of architectural firm Adjaye Associates, which has offices in London, Berlin, New York, Accra and Shanghai. The firm holds commissions for projects around the world, including the Nobel Peace Centre in Oslo (2005),  the Moscow School of Management Skolkov (2010), the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver (2007), and two public libraries in Washington, D.C. (2012).

In 2009, a team led by Adjaye was selected to design the new $360 million Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Adjaye is currently a visiting professor of architecture and design at Yale. He was awarded the OBE for services to architecture in 2007, received the Design Miami/ Year of the Artist title in 2011 and the Wall Street Journal Innovator Award in 2013. Special thanks to Jane Schulak and Culture Lab Detroit for helping to bring Adjaye to Cranbrook.

GreggThen, on May 5 at 6pm, we will be joined by Gregg Pasquarelli, AIA,
Principal of SHoP Architects and SHoP Construction. Pasquarelli is one of seven principals at SHoP, helping to oversee a team of 160 architects and designers who have created projects such as the Barclays Center in New York and Google’s offices in Mountain View, California. Just this year, SHoP was named “Most Innovative Architecture Firm in the World” by Fast Company magazine.

In addition to his work with SHoP, Pasquarelli is a fellow of the National Academy, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Architectural League of New York.  He has served as the Saarinen Professor of Architecture at Yale University, and has also held teaching positions at Columbia University, the University of Virginia, Syracuse University, and the University of Florida. Gregg’s commitment as not only a practitioner but as an educator demonstrates his dedication to impacting his field, challenging a new generation of architects to understand that innovative and beautiful architecture, and technological proficiency are not mutually exclusive.

About the J. Robert F. Swanson Lecture at Cranbrook Academy of Art
The J. Robert F. Swanson Lecture Fund at Cranbrook Academy of Art was established in 1983 by the family of J. Robert F. Swanson, a noted architect who was also the son-in-law of Eliel Saarinen. Each year, the Swanson Lecture brings to the Cranbrook campus architects, designers, artists or scholars who have received critical acclaim for their work and enjoy a sustained record of excellence and achievement in their respective field.  J. Robert F. Swanson and his wife and lifelong design partner, Pipsan Saarinen Swanson, founded their firm Swanson Associates in 1947 and worked on many exteriors and interiors, including residences, schools, universities, churches, airports, banks, and government, industrial and commercial projects.

Each lecture will be held in de Salle Auditorium at Cranbrook Art Museum. Admission is included with Museum admission, and free to students with identification.

Cranbrook Academy of Art
Cranbrook Academy of Art is the country’s top ranked, graduate-only program in architecture, design and fine art. Each year, just 75 students are invited to study and live on our landmark Saarinen-designed campus, which features private studios, state-of-the art workshops, a renowned Art Museum, and 300 acres of forests, lakes, and streams, all a short drive from the red-hot art, design, and music scene of Detroit. The focus at Cranbrook is on studio practice in one of ten disciplines: Architecture, 2D and 3D Design, Ceramics, Fiber, Metalsmithing, Painting, Photography, Print Media, and Sculpture. The program is anchored by celebrated Artists- and Designers-in-Residence, one for each discipline, all of whom live and practice on campus alongside our students. For more information, visit us at www.cranbrookart.edu.